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Footwear for cold work: a field study about work on high masts

Kuklane, Kalev LU ; Gavhed, Désirée and Holmér, Ingvar LU (2000) Ergonomics of Protective Clothing: NOKOBETEF 6 and 1st European Conference on Protective Clothing In Arbete och hälsa p.75-78
Abstract
A series of field studies at cold workplaces were initiated. This paper deals with the study at a telecommunication company and the main attention is paid to the thermal responses of the feet and footwear performance. The study was carried out in February. Eight male workers were the subjects. They were selected among volunteers who carried out various jobs on high masts on four different days. The work was done in pairs on four different masts in Sweden. The insulation of the boots was between 0.33 and 0.35 m2°C/W. Various woollen socks were worn, but also cotton, fibre-pile and synthetic socks, usually together with a woollen sock. Temperature sensors were taped to the second toe and dorsal foot. The workers were observed during the... (More)
A series of field studies at cold workplaces were initiated. This paper deals with the study at a telecommunication company and the main attention is paid to the thermal responses of the feet and footwear performance. The study was carried out in February. Eight male workers were the subjects. They were selected among volunteers who carried out various jobs on high masts on four different days. The work was done in pairs on four different masts in Sweden. The insulation of the boots was between 0.33 and 0.35 m2°C/W. Various woollen socks were worn, but also cotton, fibre-pile and synthetic socks, usually together with a woollen sock. Temperature sensors were taped to the second toe and dorsal foot. The workers were observed during the whole workday. The lowest average foot skin temperature was 26.7 °C. The lowest measured foot skin temperature was 20.7 °C. The mean difference between the toe and foot skin temperatures was 7 °C. All the subjects had the toe temperatures under 18 °C at least once. The lowest mean toe skin temperature was 17.1-2.2 °C and the lowest measured toe temperature was 9.8 °C. The sweat accumulation in the footwear was at average 37 g (6-94 g) per day (7.5-3.7 g/h). Around 4 g of that stayed in the socks at the end of the day. The footwear was generally considered comfortable. Problems with the footwear were reported to be stiff in the cold, cold feet, sweaty or wet feet. One person slipped during the day, but did not fall. The footwear in combination with the chosen socks worked well in the particular weather conditions (-2 to -8 °C). However, more attention should be paid to the cold protection of toes. During low foot activity the toe temperatures dropped relatively quickly at air temperatures of about -10 °C and/or high wind speeds (about 10 m/s). (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
in
Arbete och hälsa
editor
Kuklane, Kalev; Holmér, Ingvar; and
issue
2000:8
pages
4 pages
publisher
National Institute for Working Life
conference name
Ergonomics of Protective Clothing: NOKOBETEF 6 and 1st European Conference on Protective Clothing
ISSN
0346-7821
ISBN
91-7045-559-7
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
0feabbd8-9a8d-4269-ba94-077cb06d0123 (old id 634768)
alternative location
http://hdl.handle.net/2077/4246
date added to LUP
2008-09-30 15:06:23
date last changed
2016-04-16 04:17:59
@inproceedings{0feabbd8-9a8d-4269-ba94-077cb06d0123,
  abstract     = {A series of field studies at cold workplaces were initiated. This paper deals with the study at a telecommunication company and the main attention is paid to the thermal responses of the feet and footwear performance. The study was carried out in February. Eight male workers were the subjects. They were selected among volunteers who carried out various jobs on high masts on four different days. The work was done in pairs on four different masts in Sweden. The insulation of the boots was between 0.33 and 0.35 m2°C/W. Various woollen socks were worn, but also cotton, fibre-pile and synthetic socks, usually together with a woollen sock. Temperature sensors were taped to the second toe and dorsal foot. The workers were observed during the whole workday. The lowest average foot skin temperature was 26.7 °C. The lowest measured foot skin temperature was 20.7 °C. The mean difference between the toe and foot skin temperatures was 7 °C. All the subjects had the toe temperatures under 18 °C at least once. The lowest mean toe skin temperature was 17.1-2.2 °C and the lowest measured toe temperature was 9.8 °C. The sweat accumulation in the footwear was at average 37 g (6-94 g) per day (7.5-3.7 g/h). Around 4 g of that stayed in the socks at the end of the day. The footwear was generally considered comfortable. Problems with the footwear were reported to be stiff in the cold, cold feet, sweaty or wet feet. One person slipped during the day, but did not fall. The footwear in combination with the chosen socks worked well in the particular weather conditions (-2 to -8 °C). However, more attention should be paid to the cold protection of toes. During low foot activity the toe temperatures dropped relatively quickly at air temperatures of about -10 °C and/or high wind speeds (about 10 m/s).},
  author       = {Kuklane, Kalev and Gavhed, Désirée and Holmér, Ingvar},
  booktitle    = {Arbete och hälsa},
  editor       = {Kuklane, Kalev and Holmér, Ingvar},
  isbn         = {91-7045-559-7},
  issn         = {0346-7821},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2000:8},
  pages        = {75--78},
  publisher    = {National Institute for Working Life},
  title        = {Footwear for cold work: a field study about work on high masts},
  year         = {2000},
}