Advanced

Intraspecific variation of taeniate bisaccate pollen within permian glossopterid sporangia, from the Prince Charles Mountains, Antarctica

Lindström, Sofie LU ; McLoughlin, Stephen and Drinnan, Andrew N (1997) In International Journal of Plant Sciences 158(5). p.673-684
Abstract
Permineralized sporangia from Late Permian sediments of the Amery Group in the Prince Charles Mountains, East Antarctica, are assigned to Arberiella sp. cf A. africana Pant ana Nautiyal. These sporangia contain between 2000 and 3000 taeniate, saccate pollen grains that are predominantly haploxylonoid bisaccate and referable to the palynotaxon Protohaploxypinus limpidus (Balme and Hennelly) Balme and Flayford. However, the sporangia also contain greater than 4% of diploxylonoid bisaccate forms comparable to Striatopodocarpidites cancellatus (Balme and Hennelly) Hart 1963, together with sporadic monosaccate and trisaccate grains that, if found dispersed, would be assigned to several different pollen form genera. Morphometric analysis of in... (More)
Permineralized sporangia from Late Permian sediments of the Amery Group in the Prince Charles Mountains, East Antarctica, are assigned to Arberiella sp. cf A. africana Pant ana Nautiyal. These sporangia contain between 2000 and 3000 taeniate, saccate pollen grains that are predominantly haploxylonoid bisaccate and referable to the palynotaxon Protohaploxypinus limpidus (Balme and Hennelly) Balme and Flayford. However, the sporangia also contain greater than 4% of diploxylonoid bisaccate forms comparable to Striatopodocarpidites cancellatus (Balme and Hennelly) Hart 1963, together with sporadic monosaccate and trisaccate grains that, if found dispersed, would be assigned to several different pollen form genera. Morphometric analysis of in situ bisaccate pollen grains and taeniate bisaccate pollen in the dispersed palynoflora indicates that in situ grains occupy only the smaller end of the total size range. The tendency for in situ grains to cluster into two different size groups may reflect differential predispersal expansion of the corpus. The in situ pollen grains are variable in most qualitative and quantitative features used for taxonomic discrimination of dispersed taeniate bisaccate pollen, and this may lead to unreliable estimates of Late Permian floristic diversity if an overly restrictive species delimitation scheme is used. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
International Journal of Plant Sciences
volume
158
issue
5
pages
673 - 684
publisher
University of Chicago Press
external identifiers
  • scopus:0030712109
ISSN
1058-5893
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
76f38f1a-ba03-441c-bf5a-b924863ced82 (old id 634868)
date added to LUP
2007-12-18 10:45:02
date last changed
2017-07-30 04:38:57
@article{76f38f1a-ba03-441c-bf5a-b924863ced82,
  abstract     = {Permineralized sporangia from Late Permian sediments of the Amery Group in the Prince Charles Mountains, East Antarctica, are assigned to Arberiella sp. cf A. africana Pant ana Nautiyal. These sporangia contain between 2000 and 3000 taeniate, saccate pollen grains that are predominantly haploxylonoid bisaccate and referable to the palynotaxon Protohaploxypinus limpidus (Balme and Hennelly) Balme and Flayford. However, the sporangia also contain greater than 4% of diploxylonoid bisaccate forms comparable to Striatopodocarpidites cancellatus (Balme and Hennelly) Hart 1963, together with sporadic monosaccate and trisaccate grains that, if found dispersed, would be assigned to several different pollen form genera. Morphometric analysis of in situ bisaccate pollen grains and taeniate bisaccate pollen in the dispersed palynoflora indicates that in situ grains occupy only the smaller end of the total size range. The tendency for in situ grains to cluster into two different size groups may reflect differential predispersal expansion of the corpus. The in situ pollen grains are variable in most qualitative and quantitative features used for taxonomic discrimination of dispersed taeniate bisaccate pollen, and this may lead to unreliable estimates of Late Permian floristic diversity if an overly restrictive species delimitation scheme is used.},
  author       = {Lindström, Sofie and McLoughlin, Stephen and Drinnan, Andrew N},
  issn         = {1058-5893},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {673--684},
  publisher    = {University of Chicago Press},
  series       = {International Journal of Plant Sciences},
  title        = {Intraspecific variation of taeniate bisaccate pollen within permian glossopterid sporangia, from the Prince Charles Mountains, Antarctica},
  volume       = {158},
  year         = {1997},
}