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Thermal properties of three sets of garments measured with a heated sweating mannequin

Kuklane, Kalev LU ; Holmér, Ingvar LU and Meinander, Harriet (1998) Problems with cold work In Arbete och hälsa p.79-81
Abstract
The choice of proper insulation for cold protection is important. However, “proper insulation” depends on activity and at lots of jobs the activity varies along the working day. The choice of low insulation for high metabolic rate makes people feel cold during low activity levels and the choice of high insulation for low metabolic rate makes them feel hot and sweat during high activity levels. The sweating increases the heat losses through evaporation and reduces the insulation due to wetting of insulation layers. With moist clothing often accompanies strong discomfort sensation.



The insulation of 3 sets of protective garments were measured on a sweating thermal mannequin. The tests were carried out both without and with... (More)
The choice of proper insulation for cold protection is important. However, “proper insulation” depends on activity and at lots of jobs the activity varies along the working day. The choice of low insulation for high metabolic rate makes people feel cold during low activity levels and the choice of high insulation for low metabolic rate makes them feel hot and sweat during high activity levels. The sweating increases the heat losses through evaporation and reduces the insulation due to wetting of insulation layers. With moist clothing often accompanies strong discomfort sensation.



The insulation of 3 sets of protective garments were measured on a sweating thermal mannequin. The tests were carried out both without and with sweating. During sweating tests the water was supplied to the mannequin at a rate of 200 g/m2h.



Sweating affected the heat balance to a considerable amount. This effect was bigger in clothing with better water vapour permeability, and it was higher at higher ambient temperature (about 35 % at 0 degrees C and 40 % at +10 degrees C). In a clothing set with impermeable outer layer the difference due to environmental temperature was very small and at both temperatures the difference stayed around 13 %. The differences in Itot,corr values for the dry and sweating measurements show the reduction of insulation due to wetting of insulation layers. For two sets with lower insulation the difference was 7-8 % at +10 degrees C, while the difference for warmest/impermeable set at the same temperature was almost 20 %. However, at 0 degrees C this difference was 9-14 % for all garments. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
in
Arbete och hälsa
editor
Holmér, Ingvar; Kuklane, Kalev; and
issue
1998:18
pages
3 pages
publisher
Arbetslivsinstitutet, Stockholm, Sweden
conference name
Problems with cold work
ISSN
0346-7821
ISBN
91-7045-483-3
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
f5337421-45b6-4406-a9b6-5ca3d21f6fac (old id 634879)
alternative location
http://hdl.handle.net/2077/4185
date added to LUP
2008-09-30 14:30:48
date last changed
2016-04-16 04:06:48
@inproceedings{f5337421-45b6-4406-a9b6-5ca3d21f6fac,
  abstract     = {The choice of proper insulation for cold protection is important. However, “proper insulation” depends on activity and at lots of jobs the activity varies along the working day. The choice of low insulation for high metabolic rate makes people feel cold during low activity levels and the choice of high insulation for low metabolic rate makes them feel hot and sweat during high activity levels. The sweating increases the heat losses through evaporation and reduces the insulation due to wetting of insulation layers. With moist clothing often accompanies strong discomfort sensation.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
The insulation of 3 sets of protective garments were measured on a sweating thermal mannequin. The tests were carried out both without and with sweating. During sweating tests the water was supplied to the mannequin at a rate of 200 g/m2h.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Sweating affected the heat balance to a considerable amount. This effect was bigger in clothing with better water vapour permeability, and it was higher at higher ambient temperature (about 35 % at 0 degrees C and 40 % at +10 degrees C). In a clothing set with impermeable outer layer the difference due to environmental temperature was very small and at both temperatures the difference stayed around 13 %. The differences in Itot,corr values for the dry and sweating measurements show the reduction of insulation due to wetting of insulation layers. For two sets with lower insulation the difference was 7-8 % at +10 degrees C, while the difference for warmest/impermeable set at the same temperature was almost 20 %. However, at 0 degrees C this difference was 9-14 % for all garments.},
  author       = {Kuklane, Kalev and Holmér, Ingvar and Meinander, Harriet},
  booktitle    = {Arbete och hälsa},
  editor       = {Holmér, Ingvar and Kuklane, Kalev},
  isbn         = {91-7045-483-3},
  issn         = {0346-7821},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1998:18},
  pages        = {79--81},
  publisher    = {Arbetslivsinstitutet, Stockholm, Sweden},
  title        = {Thermal properties of three sets of garments measured with a heated sweating mannequin},
  year         = {1998},
}