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A field study in dairy farms: thermal condition of feet

Kuklane, Kalev LU ; Gavhed, Désirée and Fredriksson, Klas (1999) 10th Year Anniversary of M.Sc. Ergonomics International Conference In [Host publication title missing] p.110-116
Abstract
In agriculture, as in industry, have many physically demanding jobs disappeared and the physical stress factors have changed. However, the working days in farms are often long, and it is difficult to hire workers for help as the work conditions are considered to be harsh. The thermal work environment in farms is one of the factors influencing the work conditions. This study aimed to find out the problems connected with feet during work in cold loose housing barns in winter time. 13 dairy farms were visited and 20 farm workers were measured. Skin temperatures and subjective responses were collected, and at the end of a work period the subjects filled in a questionnaire about the work day. The foot skin temperatures were measured on dorsal... (More)
In agriculture, as in industry, have many physically demanding jobs disappeared and the physical stress factors have changed. However, the working days in farms are often long, and it is difficult to hire workers for help as the work conditions are considered to be harsh. The thermal work environment in farms is one of the factors influencing the work conditions. This study aimed to find out the problems connected with feet during work in cold loose housing barns in winter time. 13 dairy farms were visited and 20 farm workers were measured. Skin temperatures and subjective responses were collected, and at the end of a work period the subjects filled in a questionnaire about the work day. The foot skin temperatures were measured on dorsal foot and second toe. Most of the workers used rubber boots. The ambient temperature outdoors varied from +5 to -11 °C. Indoor temperatures were the same as outdoors (cold barns and fodder storage) or close to 30 °C (milk room). The lowest measured foot and toe skin temperatures over the whole work period were 24.102.6 °C and 16.001.4 °C. The lowest measured values were 20.1 °C and 12.8 °C respectively. The toe temperatures were on average 7.3 °C colder than foot temperatures (mean 28.8 °C). The low foot skin temperature was well related to cold sensation, while low temperatures of toes fitted better with wetness sensation. On average the thermal sensation of feet over the work period was neutral and the lowest ratings were cold (-2). The combination of various environmental factors in farms make it difficult to find perfect footwear for work. Some recommendations on the choice of footwear and their care are given. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Milking, Cold, Footwear, Feet, Dairy farms, Skin temperature, Thermal comfort
in
[Host publication title missing]
editor
Abeysekera, John; Lönnroth, Emma-Christin; Piamonte, Dominic Paul T.; Shahnavaz, Houshang; ; ; and
pages
7 pages
publisher
Division of Industrial Ergonomics, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden
conference name
10th Year Anniversary of M.Sc. Ergonomics International Conference
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
1039331e-b508-4a89-8bbd-8a36914995ec (old id 635355)
date added to LUP
2008-09-24 12:51:56
date last changed
2016-09-20 09:37:05
@inproceedings{1039331e-b508-4a89-8bbd-8a36914995ec,
  abstract     = {In agriculture, as in industry, have many physically demanding jobs disappeared and the physical stress factors have changed. However, the working days in farms are often long, and it is difficult to hire workers for help as the work conditions are considered to be harsh. The thermal work environment in farms is one of the factors influencing the work conditions. This study aimed to find out the problems connected with feet during work in cold loose housing barns in winter time. 13 dairy farms were visited and 20 farm workers were measured. Skin temperatures and subjective responses were collected, and at the end of a work period the subjects filled in a questionnaire about the work day. The foot skin temperatures were measured on dorsal foot and second toe. Most of the workers used rubber boots. The ambient temperature outdoors varied from +5 to -11 °C. Indoor temperatures were the same as outdoors (cold barns and fodder storage) or close to 30 °C (milk room). The lowest measured foot and toe skin temperatures over the whole work period were 24.102.6 °C and 16.001.4 °C. The lowest measured values were 20.1 °C and 12.8 °C respectively. The toe temperatures were on average 7.3 °C colder than foot temperatures (mean 28.8 °C). The low foot skin temperature was well related to cold sensation, while low temperatures of toes fitted better with wetness sensation. On average the thermal sensation of feet over the work period was neutral and the lowest ratings were cold (-2). The combination of various environmental factors in farms make it difficult to find perfect footwear for work. Some recommendations on the choice of footwear and their care are given.},
  author       = {Kuklane, Kalev and Gavhed, Désirée and Fredriksson, Klas},
  booktitle    = {[Host publication title missing]},
  editor       = {Abeysekera, John and Lönnroth, Emma-Christin and Piamonte, Dominic Paul T. and Shahnavaz, Houshang},
  keyword      = {Milking,Cold,Footwear,Feet,Dairy farms,Skin temperature,Thermal comfort},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {110--116},
  publisher    = {Division of Industrial Ergonomics, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden},
  title        = {A field study in dairy farms: thermal condition of feet},
  year         = {1999},
}