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Gender Differences in Environmental Impacts from Patterns of Transportation. A case study from Sweden

Carlsson-Kanyama, Annika; Lindén, Anna-Lisa LU and Thelander, Åsa LU (1999) In Society & Natural Resources 12. p.355-369
Abstract
Addressing unsustainable consumption patterns is an important target for fulfilling the goals set in, among others, Agenda 21 and the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Gender differences in consumption patterns and their environmental impact have so far been poorly investigated.

Gender differences in travelling patterns in Sweden are explored using data from the National Travel Survey. Such differences are shown to be large, both in terms of distances travelled, modes of transport, energy consumption and in terms of emissions of CO2. The average CO2 emissions from mens´ mode of transportation was 53 % higher during 1996 compared to the CO2 emissions from womens' mode of transportation during the same year.... (More)
Addressing unsustainable consumption patterns is an important target for fulfilling the goals set in, among others, Agenda 21 and the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Gender differences in consumption patterns and their environmental impact have so far been poorly investigated.

Gender differences in travelling patterns in Sweden are explored using data from the National Travel Survey. Such differences are shown to be large, both in terms of distances travelled, modes of transport, energy consumption and in terms of emissions of CO2. The average CO2 emissions from mens´ mode of transportation was 53 % higher during 1996 compared to the CO2 emissions from womens' mode of transportation during the same year. This is due to the fact that men travel longer, but also because men travel with more energy demanding vehicles than women. It is argued that those differences cannot be explained by differences in employment rate, but possibly by differences in sectors of employment, holder of a driving license, income and car ownership. Gender differences in social and cultural aspects affecting environmental impacts from consumption patterns and lifestyles should not be ignored in further work for a sustainable society. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
sociologi, sociology, travel, transportation, environmental impacts, gender
in
Society & Natural Resources
volume
12
pages
355 - 369
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • scopus:0032864602
ISSN
0894-1920
project
Ways Ahead/Utvägar
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
68d37db7-574c-477a-97e3-5331d6f6b273 (old id 638699)
date added to LUP
2007-12-03 11:11:19
date last changed
2017-07-23 04:49:31
@article{68d37db7-574c-477a-97e3-5331d6f6b273,
  abstract     = {Addressing unsustainable consumption patterns is an important target for fulfilling the goals set in, among others, Agenda 21 and the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Gender differences in consumption patterns and their environmental impact have so far been poorly investigated. <br/><br>
	Gender differences in travelling patterns in Sweden are explored using data from the National Travel Survey. Such differences are shown to be large, both in terms of distances travelled, modes of transport, energy consumption and in terms of emissions of CO2. The average CO2 emissions from mens´ mode of transportation was 53 % higher during 1996 compared to the CO2 emissions from womens' mode of transportation during the same year. This is due to the fact that men travel longer, but also because men travel with more energy demanding vehicles than women. It is argued that those differences cannot be explained by differences in employment rate, but possibly by differences in sectors of employment, holder of a driving license, income and car ownership. Gender differences in social and cultural aspects affecting environmental impacts from consumption patterns and lifestyles should not be ignored in further work for a sustainable society.},
  author       = {Carlsson-Kanyama, Annika and Lindén, Anna-Lisa and Thelander, Åsa},
  issn         = {0894-1920},
  keyword      = {sociologi,sociology,travel,transportation,environmental impacts,gender},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {355--369},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Society & Natural Resources},
  title        = {Gender Differences in Environmental Impacts from Patterns of Transportation. A case study from Sweden},
  volume       = {12},
  year         = {1999},
}