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Rosiglitazone reduces office and diastolic ambulatory blood pressure following 1-year treatment in non-diabetic subjects with insulin resistance

Nilsson, Peter LU ; Hedblad, Bo LU ; Donaldson, Jill and Berglund, Göran LU (2007) In Blood Pressure 16(2). p.95-100
Abstract
Objective. Rosiglitazone (RSG) has been reported to reduce blood pressure (BP) in patients with type-2 diabetes, but similar effects in non-diabetic people with insulin resistance is less clear. Our aim was to test the long-term BP-lowering effects of RSG compared with placebo. Methods. We recruited participants for BP evaluation of RSG treatment from a larger intervention trial. Office BP was recorded in 355 non-diabetic subjects with insulin resistance randomized to receive either RSG or placebo for 52 weeks. Ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM; Spacelab 90207) was performed in a subgroup of 24 subjects (RSG: n = 11; placebo n = 13). Results. After 1 year, the office BP decreased by -3.1 mmHg systolic (p < 0.05) and -3.8 mmHg diastolic (p... (More)
Objective. Rosiglitazone (RSG) has been reported to reduce blood pressure (BP) in patients with type-2 diabetes, but similar effects in non-diabetic people with insulin resistance is less clear. Our aim was to test the long-term BP-lowering effects of RSG compared with placebo. Methods. We recruited participants for BP evaluation of RSG treatment from a larger intervention trial. Office BP was recorded in 355 non-diabetic subjects with insulin resistance randomized to receive either RSG or placebo for 52 weeks. Ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM; Spacelab 90207) was performed in a subgroup of 24 subjects (RSG: n = 11; placebo n = 13). Results. After 1 year, the office BP decreased by -3.1 mmHg systolic (p < 0.05) and -3.8 mmHg diastolic (p < 0.001) in the RSG group versus placebo. In patients treated with RSG, at 1 year there was a trend for a reduction from baseline for mean 24-h diastolic BP (DBP), daytime DBP and night-time DBP (- 4.39, -5.26 and -2.93 mmHg, respectively). However, only daytime DBP was significantly lower in the RSG group compared with control (adjusted mean difference: -4.41 mmHg, p=0.007). There was also a non-significant trend for a reduction in mean 24-h systolic BP (SBP), daytime SBP and night-time SBP (-2.70, -2.51 and -3.35 mmHg, respectively). Conclusions. RSG treatment for 1 year was associated with a small but significant decrease in diastolic 24- h ambulatory diastolic BP, and both systolic and diastolic office BPs in non-diabetic people with insulin resistance. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
rosiglitazone, blood pressure, insulin resistance, trial, ambulatory
in
Blood Pressure
volume
16
issue
2
pages
95 - 100
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000247933200005
  • scopus:34447323014
ISSN
0803-7051
DOI
10.1080/08037050701396652
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
bacea631-b245-4ef4-ae86-ba207c4af64f (old id 645952)
date added to LUP
2007-12-14 09:22:04
date last changed
2017-01-01 04:50:57
@article{bacea631-b245-4ef4-ae86-ba207c4af64f,
  abstract     = {Objective. Rosiglitazone (RSG) has been reported to reduce blood pressure (BP) in patients with type-2 diabetes, but similar effects in non-diabetic people with insulin resistance is less clear. Our aim was to test the long-term BP-lowering effects of RSG compared with placebo. Methods. We recruited participants for BP evaluation of RSG treatment from a larger intervention trial. Office BP was recorded in 355 non-diabetic subjects with insulin resistance randomized to receive either RSG or placebo for 52 weeks. Ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM; Spacelab 90207) was performed in a subgroup of 24 subjects (RSG: n = 11; placebo n = 13). Results. After 1 year, the office BP decreased by -3.1 mmHg systolic (p &lt; 0.05) and -3.8 mmHg diastolic (p &lt; 0.001) in the RSG group versus placebo. In patients treated with RSG, at 1 year there was a trend for a reduction from baseline for mean 24-h diastolic BP (DBP), daytime DBP and night-time DBP (- 4.39, -5.26 and -2.93 mmHg, respectively). However, only daytime DBP was significantly lower in the RSG group compared with control (adjusted mean difference: -4.41 mmHg, p=0.007). There was also a non-significant trend for a reduction in mean 24-h systolic BP (SBP), daytime SBP and night-time SBP (-2.70, -2.51 and -3.35 mmHg, respectively). Conclusions. RSG treatment for 1 year was associated with a small but significant decrease in diastolic 24- h ambulatory diastolic BP, and both systolic and diastolic office BPs in non-diabetic people with insulin resistance.},
  author       = {Nilsson, Peter and Hedblad, Bo and Donaldson, Jill and Berglund, Göran},
  issn         = {0803-7051},
  keyword      = {rosiglitazone,blood pressure,insulin resistance,trial,ambulatory},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {95--100},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Blood Pressure},
  title        = {Rosiglitazone reduces office and diastolic ambulatory blood pressure following 1-year treatment in non-diabetic subjects with insulin resistance},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08037050701396652},
  volume       = {16},
  year         = {2007},
}