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Physician consultation and antibiotic prescription in Swedish infants: population-based comparison of group daycare and home care

Hedin, Katarina LU ; Andre, Malin; Håkansson, Anders LU ; Molstad, Sigvard; Rodhe, Nils and Petersson, Christer (2007) In Acta Pædiatrica 96(7). p.1059-1063
Abstract
Background: Daycare infants have more infectious episodes, see a physician more often, and are prescribed antibiotics more often than home care infants. Aim: To compare physician consultations and antibiotic prescription in daycare children and home care children taking number of symptom days, sociodemographic factors, concern about infectious illness and antibiotic knowledge into account. Methods: For a cohort of Swedish 18-month-old children all infectious symptoms, physician consultation and antibiotic prescriptions were registered during 1 month. Results: 561 infants with daycare outside the home and 278 with daycare at home were included. Of the daycare infants, 23.2% saw a physician and 11.4% were prescribed antibiotics, as compared... (More)
Background: Daycare infants have more infectious episodes, see a physician more often, and are prescribed antibiotics more often than home care infants. Aim: To compare physician consultations and antibiotic prescription in daycare children and home care children taking number of symptom days, sociodemographic factors, concern about infectious illness and antibiotic knowledge into account. Methods: For a cohort of Swedish 18-month-old children all infectious symptoms, physician consultation and antibiotic prescriptions were registered during 1 month. Results: 561 infants with daycare outside the home and 278 with daycare at home were included. Of the daycare infants, 23.2% saw a physician and 11.4% were prescribed antibiotics, as compared with 10.8% physician consultations and 5.0% antibiotic prescription for the home care infants. For daycare infants the crude odds ratio for physician consultation were 2.49 (1.63-3.82) and for antibiotic prescription 2.43 (1.34-4.41) compared with home care infants. However, these differences were no longer statistically significant when background data, concern about infectious illness and reported symptoms were taken into account. Conclusion: When background data, concern about infectious illness and reported infectious symptoms were taken into account daycare infants saw a physician and was prescribed antibiotics in the same way as home care infants (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
infectious symptoms, infants, antibiotic consumption, daycare, physician consultation
in
Acta Pædiatrica
volume
96
issue
7
pages
1059 - 1063
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd
external identifiers
  • wos:000247681600027
  • scopus:34250662534
ISSN
1651-2227
DOI
10.1111/j.1651-2227.2007.00323.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d1a2ba86-1f6d-49a2-a48a-e3c49d88b5ca (old id 647618)
date added to LUP
2007-12-11 13:22:04
date last changed
2017-02-26 04:12:56
@article{d1a2ba86-1f6d-49a2-a48a-e3c49d88b5ca,
  abstract     = {Background: Daycare infants have more infectious episodes, see a physician more often, and are prescribed antibiotics more often than home care infants. Aim: To compare physician consultations and antibiotic prescription in daycare children and home care children taking number of symptom days, sociodemographic factors, concern about infectious illness and antibiotic knowledge into account. Methods: For a cohort of Swedish 18-month-old children all infectious symptoms, physician consultation and antibiotic prescriptions were registered during 1 month. Results: 561 infants with daycare outside the home and 278 with daycare at home were included. Of the daycare infants, 23.2% saw a physician and 11.4% were prescribed antibiotics, as compared with 10.8% physician consultations and 5.0% antibiotic prescription for the home care infants. For daycare infants the crude odds ratio for physician consultation were 2.49 (1.63-3.82) and for antibiotic prescription 2.43 (1.34-4.41) compared with home care infants. However, these differences were no longer statistically significant when background data, concern about infectious illness and reported symptoms were taken into account. Conclusion: When background data, concern about infectious illness and reported infectious symptoms were taken into account daycare infants saw a physician and was prescribed antibiotics in the same way as home care infants},
  author       = {Hedin, Katarina and Andre, Malin and Håkansson, Anders and Molstad, Sigvard and Rodhe, Nils and Petersson, Christer},
  issn         = {1651-2227},
  keyword      = {infectious symptoms,infants,antibiotic consumption,daycare,physician consultation},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {1059--1063},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd},
  series       = {Acta Pædiatrica},
  title        = {Physician consultation and antibiotic prescription in Swedish infants: population-based comparison of group daycare and home care},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1651-2227.2007.00323.x},
  volume       = {96},
  year         = {2007},
}