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Auditory event-related potentials and cognitive function of preterm children at five years of age

Mikkola, Kaija; Kushnerenko, Elena; Partanen, Eino; Serenius-Sirve, Silve; Leipala, Jaana; Huotilainen, Minna and Fellman, Vineta LU (2007) In Clinical Neurophysiology 118(7). p.1494-1502
Abstract
Objective: In our previous study, auditory event-related potentials (AERPs) in preterm 1-year-old children had a positive deflection at 150-350 ms that correlated positively with their 2-year neurodevelopmental outcome. In a study of the same subjects at age 5, our aim was to assess AERPs and their relationship to neuropsychological test results. Methods: Preterm small (SGA, n = 13), appropriate for gestational age (AGA, n = 15), and control (n = 13) children were assessed with an Easy paradigm presenting a large frequency change accompanied with occasional novel sounds, and a Challenging paradigm presenting small frequency and duration changes with a rapid rate. The preterm children underwent neurocognitive tests. Results: Easy paradigm.... (More)
Objective: In our previous study, auditory event-related potentials (AERPs) in preterm 1-year-old children had a positive deflection at 150-350 ms that correlated positively with their 2-year neurodevelopmental outcome. In a study of the same subjects at age 5, our aim was to assess AERPs and their relationship to neuropsychological test results. Methods: Preterm small (SGA, n = 13), appropriate for gestational age (AGA, n = 15), and control (n = 13) children were assessed with an Easy paradigm presenting a large frequency change accompanied with occasional novel sounds, and a Challenging paradigm presenting small frequency and duration changes with a rapid rate. The preterm children underwent neurocognitive tests. Results: Easy paradigm. The P1 response to frequency deviant was smaller and MMN larger in the preterm than in the control children. Challenging paradigm. The P1 response to standard, frequency, and duration deviants was smaller in the preterm than in the control children. The N2 response to frequency deviant was larger in the preterm than in the control children. AGA and SGA children had similar AERPs. The P1, N2, and MMN amplitudes correlated with verbal IQ and NEPSY language subtests. Conclusions: Small P1 response(s) appears to be typical for preterm children. Significance: Small P1 response in preterm children may suggest altered primary auditory processing. (c) 2007 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
cortical responses, prematurity, MMN, ERP, P1, neurocognition
in
Clinical Neurophysiology
volume
118
issue
7
pages
1494 - 1502
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000247583500009
  • scopus:34249724498
ISSN
1872-8952
DOI
10.1016/j.clinph.2007.04.012
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b017a929-8ee6-4429-a3de-413879946e0a (old id 647822)
date added to LUP
2007-12-14 09:26:23
date last changed
2017-10-01 03:41:16
@article{b017a929-8ee6-4429-a3de-413879946e0a,
  abstract     = {Objective: In our previous study, auditory event-related potentials (AERPs) in preterm 1-year-old children had a positive deflection at 150-350 ms that correlated positively with their 2-year neurodevelopmental outcome. In a study of the same subjects at age 5, our aim was to assess AERPs and their relationship to neuropsychological test results. Methods: Preterm small (SGA, n = 13), appropriate for gestational age (AGA, n = 15), and control (n = 13) children were assessed with an Easy paradigm presenting a large frequency change accompanied with occasional novel sounds, and a Challenging paradigm presenting small frequency and duration changes with a rapid rate. The preterm children underwent neurocognitive tests. Results: Easy paradigm. The P1 response to frequency deviant was smaller and MMN larger in the preterm than in the control children. Challenging paradigm. The P1 response to standard, frequency, and duration deviants was smaller in the preterm than in the control children. The N2 response to frequency deviant was larger in the preterm than in the control children. AGA and SGA children had similar AERPs. The P1, N2, and MMN amplitudes correlated with verbal IQ and NEPSY language subtests. Conclusions: Small P1 response(s) appears to be typical for preterm children. Significance: Small P1 response in preterm children may suggest altered primary auditory processing. (c) 2007 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Mikkola, Kaija and Kushnerenko, Elena and Partanen, Eino and Serenius-Sirve, Silve and Leipala, Jaana and Huotilainen, Minna and Fellman, Vineta},
  issn         = {1872-8952},
  keyword      = {cortical responses,prematurity,MMN,ERP,P1,neurocognition},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {1494--1502},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Clinical Neurophysiology},
  title        = {Auditory event-related potentials and cognitive function of preterm children at five years of age},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clinph.2007.04.012},
  volume       = {118},
  year         = {2007},
}