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CD133 is not present on neurogenic astrocytes in the adult subventricular zone, but on embryonic neural stem cells, ependymal cells, and glioblastoma cells

Pfenninger, Cosima LU ; Roschupkina, Teona LU ; Hertwig, Falk LU ; Kottwitz, Denise LU ; Englund, Elisabet LU ; Bengzon, Johan LU ; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik W LU and Nuber, Ulrike LU (2007) In Cancer Research 67(12). p.5727-5736
Abstract
Human brain tumor stem cells have been enriched using antibodies against the surface protein CD133. An antibody recognizing CD133 also served to isolate normal neural stem cells from fetal human brain, suggesting a possible lineage relationship between normal neural and brain tumor stem cells. Whether CD133-positive brain tumor stem cells can be derived from CD133-positive neural stem or progenitor cells still requires direct experimental evidence, and an important step toward such investigations is the identification and characterization of normal CD133-presenting cells in neurogenic regions of the embryonic and adult brain. Here, we present evidence that CD133 is a marker for embryonic neural stem cells, an intermediate radial... (More)
Human brain tumor stem cells have been enriched using antibodies against the surface protein CD133. An antibody recognizing CD133 also served to isolate normal neural stem cells from fetal human brain, suggesting a possible lineage relationship between normal neural and brain tumor stem cells. Whether CD133-positive brain tumor stem cells can be derived from CD133-positive neural stem or progenitor cells still requires direct experimental evidence, and an important step toward such investigations is the identification and characterization of normal CD133-presenting cells in neurogenic regions of the embryonic and adult brain. Here, we present evidence that CD133 is a marker for embryonic neural stem cells, an intermediate radial glial/ependymal cell type in the early postnatal stage, and for ependymal cells in the adult brain, but not for neurogenic astrocytes in the adult subventricular zone. Our findings suggest two principal possibilities for the origin of brain tumor stem cells: a derivation from CD133-expressing cells, which are normally not present in the adult brain (embryonic neural stem cells and an early postnatal intermediate radial glial/ependymal cell type), or from CD133-positive ependymal cells in the adult brain, which are, however, generally regarded as postmitotic. Alternatively, brain tumor stem cells could be derived from proliferative but CD133-negative neurogenic astrocytes in the adult brain. In the latter case, brain tumor development would involve the production of CD133. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Cancer Research
volume
67
issue
12
pages
5727 - 5736
publisher
American Association for Cancer Research Inc.
external identifiers
  • wos:000247360100022
  • scopus:34250794574
ISSN
1538-7445
DOI
10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-07-0183
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d72f49e0-dc2b-4fab-b542-4ae6ee4385f5 (old id 648157)
date added to LUP
2007-12-14 08:45:59
date last changed
2017-11-05 04:28:04
@article{d72f49e0-dc2b-4fab-b542-4ae6ee4385f5,
  abstract     = {Human brain tumor stem cells have been enriched using antibodies against the surface protein CD133. An antibody recognizing CD133 also served to isolate normal neural stem cells from fetal human brain, suggesting a possible lineage relationship between normal neural and brain tumor stem cells. Whether CD133-positive brain tumor stem cells can be derived from CD133-positive neural stem or progenitor cells still requires direct experimental evidence, and an important step toward such investigations is the identification and characterization of normal CD133-presenting cells in neurogenic regions of the embryonic and adult brain. Here, we present evidence that CD133 is a marker for embryonic neural stem cells, an intermediate radial glial/ependymal cell type in the early postnatal stage, and for ependymal cells in the adult brain, but not for neurogenic astrocytes in the adult subventricular zone. Our findings suggest two principal possibilities for the origin of brain tumor stem cells: a derivation from CD133-expressing cells, which are normally not present in the adult brain (embryonic neural stem cells and an early postnatal intermediate radial glial/ependymal cell type), or from CD133-positive ependymal cells in the adult brain, which are, however, generally regarded as postmitotic. Alternatively, brain tumor stem cells could be derived from proliferative but CD133-negative neurogenic astrocytes in the adult brain. In the latter case, brain tumor development would involve the production of CD133.},
  author       = {Pfenninger, Cosima and Roschupkina, Teona and Hertwig, Falk and Kottwitz, Denise and Englund, Elisabet and Bengzon, Johan and Jacobsen, Sten Eirik W and Nuber, Ulrike},
  issn         = {1538-7445},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {12},
  pages        = {5727--5736},
  publisher    = {American Association for Cancer Research Inc.},
  series       = {Cancer Research},
  title        = {CD133 is not present on neurogenic astrocytes in the adult subventricular zone, but on embryonic neural stem cells, ependymal cells, and glioblastoma cells},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-07-0183},
  volume       = {67},
  year         = {2007},
}