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Neural precursors isolated from the developing cat brain show retinal integration following transplantation to the retina of the dystrophic cat

Klassen, Henry; Schwartz, Philip H.; Ziaeian, Boback; Nethercott, Hubert; Young, Michael J.; Bragadottir, Ragnheidur; Tullis, Gregory E.; Warfvinge, Karin LU and Narfstrom, Kristina (2007) In Veterinary Ophthalmology 10(4). p.245-253
Abstract
The cat has served as an important nonrodent research model for neurophysiology and retinal degenerative disease processes, yet very little is known about feline neural precursor cells. To culture these cells and evaluate marker expression, brains were dissected from 45-day-old fetuses, enzymatically dissociated, and grown in the presence of EGF, bFGF and PDGF. Expanded cells widely expressed nestin, Sox2, Ki-67, fusin (CXCR4) and vimentin, while subpopulations expressed A2B5, GFAP, or beta-III tubulin. Precursors prelabeled with BrdU and/or transduced with a recombinant lentivirus that expresses GFP were transplanted subretinally in five dystrophic Abyssinian cats. Two to 4 weeks following surgery, histology showed survival of grafted... (More)
The cat has served as an important nonrodent research model for neurophysiology and retinal degenerative disease processes, yet very little is known about feline neural precursor cells. To culture these cells and evaluate marker expression, brains were dissected from 45-day-old fetuses, enzymatically dissociated, and grown in the presence of EGF, bFGF and PDGF. Expanded cells widely expressed nestin, Sox2, Ki-67, fusin (CXCR4) and vimentin, while subpopulations expressed A2B5, GFAP, or beta-III tubulin. Precursors prelabeled with BrdU and/or transduced with a recombinant lentivirus that expresses GFP were transplanted subretinally in five dystrophic Abyssinian cats. Two to 4 weeks following surgery, histology showed survival of grafted cells in three of the animals. Labeled cells were found in the neuroretina and RPE layer, as well as in the vitreous and the vicinity of Bruch's membrane. There was no evidence of an immunologic response in any of the eyes. Neural precursor cells can therefore be cultured from the developing cat brain and survive as allografts for up to 4 weeks without immune suppression. The feasibility of deriving and transplanting feline neural precursor cells, combined with the availability of the dystrophic Abyssinian cat, provide a new feline model system for the study of retinal repair. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
stem cells, feline, progenitor cells, retinal degeneration
in
Veterinary Ophthalmology
volume
10
issue
4
pages
245 - 253
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000247206300008
  • scopus:34250177644
ISSN
1463-5216
DOI
10.1111/j.1463-5224.2007.00547.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
59157366-0089-47b1-a4c3-7428d662f859 (old id 648606)
date added to LUP
2007-12-13 16:59:08
date last changed
2017-01-22 04:11:41
@article{59157366-0089-47b1-a4c3-7428d662f859,
  abstract     = {The cat has served as an important nonrodent research model for neurophysiology and retinal degenerative disease processes, yet very little is known about feline neural precursor cells. To culture these cells and evaluate marker expression, brains were dissected from 45-day-old fetuses, enzymatically dissociated, and grown in the presence of EGF, bFGF and PDGF. Expanded cells widely expressed nestin, Sox2, Ki-67, fusin (CXCR4) and vimentin, while subpopulations expressed A2B5, GFAP, or beta-III tubulin. Precursors prelabeled with BrdU and/or transduced with a recombinant lentivirus that expresses GFP were transplanted subretinally in five dystrophic Abyssinian cats. Two to 4 weeks following surgery, histology showed survival of grafted cells in three of the animals. Labeled cells were found in the neuroretina and RPE layer, as well as in the vitreous and the vicinity of Bruch's membrane. There was no evidence of an immunologic response in any of the eyes. Neural precursor cells can therefore be cultured from the developing cat brain and survive as allografts for up to 4 weeks without immune suppression. The feasibility of deriving and transplanting feline neural precursor cells, combined with the availability of the dystrophic Abyssinian cat, provide a new feline model system for the study of retinal repair.},
  author       = {Klassen, Henry and Schwartz, Philip H. and Ziaeian, Boback and Nethercott, Hubert and Young, Michael J. and Bragadottir, Ragnheidur and Tullis, Gregory E. and Warfvinge, Karin and Narfstrom, Kristina},
  issn         = {1463-5216},
  keyword      = {stem cells,feline,progenitor cells,retinal degeneration},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {245--253},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Veterinary Ophthalmology},
  title        = {Neural precursors isolated from the developing cat brain show retinal integration following transplantation to the retina of the dystrophic cat},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1463-5224.2007.00547.x},
  volume       = {10},
  year         = {2007},
}