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Measuring chemical heat production rates of biofuels by isothermal calorimetry for hazardous evaluation modelling

Wadsö, Lars LU (2007) In Fire and Materials 31(4). p.241-255
Abstract
Biofuels are commonly stored in large stacks that may heat up and self-ignite from microbiological and chemical heat production. This paper shows how isothermal (heat conduction) calorimetry can be used to measure heat production rates of biofuels at relatively low temperatures close to where self-heating starts to become a problem. Measurements can be made to assess how the reaction rate is a function of such factors as temperature, extent of reaction, oxygen pressure, water content and the presence of catalytic compounds. In the present paper, measurements on pellets made of wood and bark are presented together with an analysis of how the reaction rate of the bark pellets depends on the oxygen pressure. It is also shown that 1% iron or... (More)
Biofuels are commonly stored in large stacks that may heat up and self-ignite from microbiological and chemical heat production. This paper shows how isothermal (heat conduction) calorimetry can be used to measure heat production rates of biofuels at relatively low temperatures close to where self-heating starts to become a problem. Measurements can be made to assess how the reaction rate is a function of such factors as temperature, extent of reaction, oxygen pressure, water content and the presence of catalytic compounds. In the present paper, measurements on pellets made of wood and bark are presented together with an analysis of how the reaction rate of the bark pellets depends on the oxygen pressure. It is also shown that 1% iron or copper ions increased the reaction rate of wood pellets by a factor of three. Copyright (c) 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
isothermal calorimetry, hazardous evaluation, thermal power, pellets, biofuel
in
Fire and Materials
volume
31
issue
4
pages
241 - 255
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • wos:000247247800002
  • scopus:34250626809
ISSN
1099-1018
DOI
10.1002/fam.936
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
55e6b0d9-d1bc-46d9-bd57-6231ba7c25b3 (old id 648905)
date added to LUP
2008-01-03 10:10:19
date last changed
2017-11-19 04:15:44
@article{55e6b0d9-d1bc-46d9-bd57-6231ba7c25b3,
  abstract     = {Biofuels are commonly stored in large stacks that may heat up and self-ignite from microbiological and chemical heat production. This paper shows how isothermal (heat conduction) calorimetry can be used to measure heat production rates of biofuels at relatively low temperatures close to where self-heating starts to become a problem. Measurements can be made to assess how the reaction rate is a function of such factors as temperature, extent of reaction, oxygen pressure, water content and the presence of catalytic compounds. In the present paper, measurements on pellets made of wood and bark are presented together with an analysis of how the reaction rate of the bark pellets depends on the oxygen pressure. It is also shown that 1% iron or copper ions increased the reaction rate of wood pellets by a factor of three. Copyright (c) 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.},
  author       = {Wadsö, Lars},
  issn         = {1099-1018},
  keyword      = {isothermal calorimetry,hazardous evaluation,thermal power,pellets,biofuel},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {241--255},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Fire and Materials},
  title        = {Measuring chemical heat production rates of biofuels by isothermal calorimetry for hazardous evaluation modelling},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/fam.936},
  volume       = {31},
  year         = {2007},
}