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Is meniscal status in the anterior cruciate ligament injured knee associated with change in bone surface area? An exploratory analysis of the KANON trial

Snoeker, B. A.M. LU ; Bowes, M. A. ; Roemer, F. W. LU ; Turkiewicz, A. LU ; Lohmander, L. S. LU ; Frobell, R. B. LU and Englund, M. LU (2021) In Osteoarthritis and Cartilage
Abstract

Objectives: To study bone shape changes as a potential early feature of post-traumatic structural knee OA development, we estimated the association between meniscal status in the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injured knee and longitudinal condyle changes in bone surface area. Design: We used data from the KANON trial, including 121 young ACL-injured adults. We obtained baseline and 2-year follow-up knee MRIs. Our outcome was change in the bone surface areas (mean mm2, log-transformed) in 4 locations (femur, tibia, patella, and trochlea femur) in the medial and lateral compartment from baseline to 2 years. Meniscal pathology was defined as both present at baseline and newly developed (i.e., incident or progressed) using ACLOAS. We... (More)

Objectives: To study bone shape changes as a potential early feature of post-traumatic structural knee OA development, we estimated the association between meniscal status in the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injured knee and longitudinal condyle changes in bone surface area. Design: We used data from the KANON trial, including 121 young ACL-injured adults. We obtained baseline and 2-year follow-up knee MRIs. Our outcome was change in the bone surface areas (mean mm2, log-transformed) in 4 locations (femur, tibia, patella, and trochlea femur) in the medial and lateral compartment from baseline to 2 years. Meniscal pathology was defined as both present at baseline and newly developed (i.e., incident or progressed) using ACLOAS. We used multilevel linear regression adjusted for baseline bone area, age, sex, body mass index, treatment arm (i.e., early or optional delayed ACL reconstruction), and location. We analyzed medial and lateral compartment separately. We present results as percentage (%) bone area change difference with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: We analyzed 109 subjects (median 27 (18–36) years, 83% men) due to missing MRI information. The bone surface area increased on average by ∼2% over 2 years. The differences between knees with and without baseline meniscal pathology were 1.1% (95%CI 0.0–2.3%) and 1.4% (95%CI 0.6–2.2%) in the medial and lateral compartment, respectively, and 1.2% (95%CI 0.3–2.0%) and 1.3% (95%CI 0.6–2.0%) for medial and lateral newly developed pathology, respectively. Conclusion: Our finding of ∼1% increase bone area in compartment with meniscal pathology suggests a potentially important association between meniscal integrity and early bone surface area changes after ACL injury. Trial registration number ISRCTN 84752559.

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author
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organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
keywords
Anterior cruciate ligament, Bone surface area changes, Meniscus, Osteoarthritis
in
Osteoarthritis and Cartilage
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • pmid:33676015
  • scopus:85103028505
ISSN
1063-4584
DOI
10.1016/j.joca.2021.02.567
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
64f10357-891d-456e-b54b-788674cf1eff
date added to LUP
2021-04-08 11:01:19
date last changed
2021-06-16 05:19:21
@article{64f10357-891d-456e-b54b-788674cf1eff,
  abstract     = {<p>Objectives: To study bone shape changes as a potential early feature of post-traumatic structural knee OA development, we estimated the association between meniscal status in the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injured knee and longitudinal condyle changes in bone surface area. Design: We used data from the KANON trial, including 121 young ACL-injured adults. We obtained baseline and 2-year follow-up knee MRIs. Our outcome was change in the bone surface areas (mean mm2, log-transformed) in 4 locations (femur, tibia, patella, and trochlea femur) in the medial and lateral compartment from baseline to 2 years. Meniscal pathology was defined as both present at baseline and newly developed (i.e., incident or progressed) using ACLOAS. We used multilevel linear regression adjusted for baseline bone area, age, sex, body mass index, treatment arm (i.e., early or optional delayed ACL reconstruction), and location. We analyzed medial and lateral compartment separately. We present results as percentage (%) bone area change difference with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: We analyzed 109 subjects (median 27 (18–36) years, 83% men) due to missing MRI information. The bone surface area increased on average by ∼2% over 2 years. The differences between knees with and without baseline meniscal pathology were 1.1% (95%CI 0.0–2.3%) and 1.4% (95%CI 0.6–2.2%) in the medial and lateral compartment, respectively, and 1.2% (95%CI 0.3–2.0%) and 1.3% (95%CI 0.6–2.0%) for medial and lateral newly developed pathology, respectively. Conclusion: Our finding of ∼1% increase bone area in compartment with meniscal pathology suggests a potentially important association between meniscal integrity and early bone surface area changes after ACL injury. Trial registration number ISRCTN 84752559.</p>},
  author       = {Snoeker, B. A.M. and Bowes, M. A. and Roemer, F. W. and Turkiewicz, A. and Lohmander, L. S. and Frobell, R. B. and Englund, M.},
  issn         = {1063-4584},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Osteoarthritis and Cartilage},
  title        = {Is meniscal status in the anterior cruciate ligament injured knee associated with change in bone surface area? An exploratory analysis of the KANON trial},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joca.2021.02.567},
  doi          = {10.1016/j.joca.2021.02.567},
  year         = {2021},
}