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Using narrative analysis to understand the combined use of complementary therapies and bio-medically oriented health care

Hok, Johanna; Wachtler, Caroline LU ; Falkenberg, Torkel and Tishelman, Carol (2007) In Social Science and Medicine 65(8). p.1642-1653
Abstract
Rather than using different therapies in isolation, many cancer patients use different therapies in a complementary fashion. Little research to date has given attention to individuals' experiences of the combined use of biomedically oriented health care (BHC) and complementary and alternative therapies (CATs). Therefore, this paper examines one individual's negotiation between complementary self-care methods and BHC in the treatment of cancer in Stockholm, Sweden. Using narrative analysis, we explore how a personal narrative is told, in addition to what is told, in order to see how the meaning of the negotiation between different therapies is created. Our analysis suggests that the BHC retains a vital role as a frame of reference for the... (More)
Rather than using different therapies in isolation, many cancer patients use different therapies in a complementary fashion. Little research to date has given attention to individuals' experiences of the combined use of biomedically oriented health care (BHC) and complementary and alternative therapies (CATs). Therefore, this paper examines one individual's negotiation between complementary self-care methods and BHC in the treatment of cancer in Stockholm, Sweden. Using narrative analysis, we explore how a personal narrative is told, in addition to what is told, in order to see how the meaning of the negotiation between different therapies is created. Our analysis suggests that the BHC retains a vital role as a frame of reference for the use of certain CATs. It is also apparent how one CAT can be used for different purposes simultaneously by one individual. A positive example is given of how a spouse interpreted his experience of successful communication about CATs with a BHC provider as indicative of a shift from a hierarchical to a more collaborative relationship. Such increased collaboration between stakeholders is an important aspect of models of 'integrative health care'. Our findings highlight the need for an open and respectful dialogue about CATs between patients, their significant others and BHC providers. (c) 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
professional-family relations, cancer, narrative analysis, Sweden, complementary therapies, integrative health care
in
Social Science and Medicine
volume
65
issue
8
pages
1642 - 1653
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000250271400008
  • scopus:34548750851
ISSN
1873-5347
DOI
10.1016/j.socscimed.2007.05.031
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
8332ee9e-48d9-48d8-861a-e8cbd6296eb3 (old id 651782)
date added to LUP
2007-12-12 14:42:38
date last changed
2017-01-08 04:08:47
@article{8332ee9e-48d9-48d8-861a-e8cbd6296eb3,
  abstract     = {Rather than using different therapies in isolation, many cancer patients use different therapies in a complementary fashion. Little research to date has given attention to individuals' experiences of the combined use of biomedically oriented health care (BHC) and complementary and alternative therapies (CATs). Therefore, this paper examines one individual's negotiation between complementary self-care methods and BHC in the treatment of cancer in Stockholm, Sweden. Using narrative analysis, we explore how a personal narrative is told, in addition to what is told, in order to see how the meaning of the negotiation between different therapies is created. Our analysis suggests that the BHC retains a vital role as a frame of reference for the use of certain CATs. It is also apparent how one CAT can be used for different purposes simultaneously by one individual. A positive example is given of how a spouse interpreted his experience of successful communication about CATs with a BHC provider as indicative of a shift from a hierarchical to a more collaborative relationship. Such increased collaboration between stakeholders is an important aspect of models of 'integrative health care'. Our findings highlight the need for an open and respectful dialogue about CATs between patients, their significant others and BHC providers. (c) 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Hok, Johanna and Wachtler, Caroline and Falkenberg, Torkel and Tishelman, Carol},
  issn         = {1873-5347},
  keyword      = {professional-family relations,cancer,narrative analysis,Sweden,complementary therapies,integrative health care},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {1642--1653},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Social Science and Medicine},
  title        = {Using narrative analysis to understand the combined use of complementary therapies and bio-medically oriented health care},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2007.05.031},
  volume       = {65},
  year         = {2007},
}