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Sphingolipids in the gut? Which are the important issues?

Nilsson, Åke LU (2007) In European Journal of Lipid Science and Technology 109(10). p.971-976
Abstract
Glycosphingolipids and sphingomyelin (SM) are important components of the apical brush border and the Golgi and enclocytic vesicles of the gut epithelium. In particular, glucosylceramide is abundant in the microvilli. Synthesis and degradation of mucosal sphingolipids and targeting of sphingolipids to distinct cell compartments during cell differentiation are thus important features of intestinal lipid metabolism. Sphingolipids are also present in the ordinary Western diet, and sphingolipid-rich formulations of dairy, plant or yeast origin are now available for studies of their biological effects in animals and humans. Since sphingolipids account for a large part of the polar lipids in milk, their digestion and effects in the suckling... (More)
Glycosphingolipids and sphingomyelin (SM) are important components of the apical brush border and the Golgi and enclocytic vesicles of the gut epithelium. In particular, glucosylceramide is abundant in the microvilli. Synthesis and degradation of mucosal sphingolipids and targeting of sphingolipids to distinct cell compartments during cell differentiation are thus important features of intestinal lipid metabolism. Sphingolipids are also present in the ordinary Western diet, and sphingolipid-rich formulations of dairy, plant or yeast origin are now available for studies of their biological effects in animals and humans. Since sphingolipids account for a large part of the polar lipids in milk, their digestion and effects in the suckling infant is of particular interest. Dietary sphingolipids are slowly digested and the exposure of the whole gut to sphingolipids and their metabolites can be increased by dietary supply. Metabolites from dietary sphingolipids may have anti -inflammatory and anticarcinogenic effects and undigested sphingolipids may be protective. Dietary sphingolipids inhibit cholesterol absorption and may have beneficial metabolic effects. Some mucosal sphingolipids have blood group A, B and H reactivity and some act as receptors for bacterial toxins and virus. Sphingolipid signaling triggered by mucosal-bacterial interaction may be important in both the gut and the bronchi. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
ceramidase, digestion, sphingolipids, intestine, sphingomyelinase
in
European Journal of Lipid Science and Technology
volume
109
issue
10
pages
971 - 976
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • wos:000250496800002
  • scopus:35548958212
ISSN
1438-7697
DOI
10.1002/ejlt.200700071
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
eaf930fd-6564-4b7d-953f-ec41d005e5f2 (old id 653169)
date added to LUP
2007-12-18 16:20:08
date last changed
2017-11-05 03:49:34
@article{eaf930fd-6564-4b7d-953f-ec41d005e5f2,
  abstract     = {Glycosphingolipids and sphingomyelin (SM) are important components of the apical brush border and the Golgi and enclocytic vesicles of the gut epithelium. In particular, glucosylceramide is abundant in the microvilli. Synthesis and degradation of mucosal sphingolipids and targeting of sphingolipids to distinct cell compartments during cell differentiation are thus important features of intestinal lipid metabolism. Sphingolipids are also present in the ordinary Western diet, and sphingolipid-rich formulations of dairy, plant or yeast origin are now available for studies of their biological effects in animals and humans. Since sphingolipids account for a large part of the polar lipids in milk, their digestion and effects in the suckling infant is of particular interest. Dietary sphingolipids are slowly digested and the exposure of the whole gut to sphingolipids and their metabolites can be increased by dietary supply. Metabolites from dietary sphingolipids may have anti -inflammatory and anticarcinogenic effects and undigested sphingolipids may be protective. Dietary sphingolipids inhibit cholesterol absorption and may have beneficial metabolic effects. Some mucosal sphingolipids have blood group A, B and H reactivity and some act as receptors for bacterial toxins and virus. Sphingolipid signaling triggered by mucosal-bacterial interaction may be important in both the gut and the bronchi.},
  author       = {Nilsson, Åke},
  issn         = {1438-7697},
  keyword      = {ceramidase,digestion,sphingolipids,intestine,sphingomyelinase},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {10},
  pages        = {971--976},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {European Journal of Lipid Science and Technology},
  title        = {Sphingolipids in the gut? Which are the important issues?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ejlt.200700071},
  volume       = {109},
  year         = {2007},
}