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Risk factor control in treated hypertensives from Estonia and Sweden. Why the difference?

Nilsson, Peter LU ; Journath, Gunilla; Palm, Kairit and Viigimaa, Margus (2007) In Blood Pressure 16(5). p.301-304
Abstract
Background. It is of importance to study the risk factor control in treated hypertensives (tHT), both longitudinally within one country and between neighbouring countries, as hypertensive patients still run an increased cardiovascular risk in spite of treatment. Methods. In sample of 1135 tHT from Estonia and a similar number of age- and sex- matched Swedish tHT, the control of blood pressure and other cardiovascular risk factors were assessed as part of national surveys in primary health care. Data were retrieved form consecutive patients visiting primary health care centres all over each country. Results. The mean age of male patients (n=421) was 50 years and for female patients (n=714) it was 52 years. tHT from Sweden were more likely... (More)
Background. It is of importance to study the risk factor control in treated hypertensives (tHT), both longitudinally within one country and between neighbouring countries, as hypertensive patients still run an increased cardiovascular risk in spite of treatment. Methods. In sample of 1135 tHT from Estonia and a similar number of age- and sex- matched Swedish tHT, the control of blood pressure and other cardiovascular risk factors were assessed as part of national surveys in primary health care. Data were retrieved form consecutive patients visiting primary health care centres all over each country. Results. The mean age of male patients (n=421) was 50 years and for female patients (n=714) it was 52 years. tHT from Sweden were more likely to be in better control of blood pressure and risk factor levels than corresponding Estonian patients, matched for age and gender. However, there was a significantly (p=0.0003) higher rate of smoking in Swedish female patients (22.4%) than in corresponding Estonian patients (16.0%). More Swedish women than men were prescribed thiazide diuretics, but fewer were prescribed angiotensin- converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. No similar Estonian data were available. Conclusion. Most cardiovascular risk factors were better controlled in the Swedish hypertensives, except for a higher smoking prevalence in Swedish female patients. This could be related not only to differences in clinical practice, but also influenced by social and lifestyle factors. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Sweden, risk factor, lipids, Estonia, hypertension, treatment
in
Blood Pressure
volume
16
issue
5
pages
301 - 304
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000250415000003
  • scopus:35348910702
ISSN
0803-7051
DOI
10.1080/08037050701517224
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
89988023-97a2-46af-b05d-7dbbc9c47520 (old id 654183)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=17934917&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-12-17 15:57:00
date last changed
2017-01-01 05:12:13
@article{89988023-97a2-46af-b05d-7dbbc9c47520,
  abstract     = {Background. It is of importance to study the risk factor control in treated hypertensives (tHT), both longitudinally within one country and between neighbouring countries, as hypertensive patients still run an increased cardiovascular risk in spite of treatment. Methods. In sample of 1135 tHT from Estonia and a similar number of age- and sex- matched Swedish tHT, the control of blood pressure and other cardiovascular risk factors were assessed as part of national surveys in primary health care. Data were retrieved form consecutive patients visiting primary health care centres all over each country. Results. The mean age of male patients (n=421) was 50 years and for female patients (n=714) it was 52 years. tHT from Sweden were more likely to be in better control of blood pressure and risk factor levels than corresponding Estonian patients, matched for age and gender. However, there was a significantly (p=0.0003) higher rate of smoking in Swedish female patients (22.4%) than in corresponding Estonian patients (16.0%). More Swedish women than men were prescribed thiazide diuretics, but fewer were prescribed angiotensin- converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. No similar Estonian data were available. Conclusion. Most cardiovascular risk factors were better controlled in the Swedish hypertensives, except for a higher smoking prevalence in Swedish female patients. This could be related not only to differences in clinical practice, but also influenced by social and lifestyle factors.},
  author       = {Nilsson, Peter and Journath, Gunilla and Palm, Kairit and Viigimaa, Margus},
  issn         = {0803-7051},
  keyword      = {Sweden,risk factor,lipids,Estonia,hypertension,treatment},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {301--304},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Blood Pressure},
  title        = {Risk factor control in treated hypertensives from Estonia and Sweden. Why the difference?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08037050701517224},
  volume       = {16},
  year         = {2007},
}