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Use of real-time interactive voice response in a study of stress and alcohol consumption

Andersson, Claes LU ; Gordh, Anna H. V. Soederpalm and Berglund, Mats LU (2007) In Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research 31(11). p.1908-1912
Abstract
Background: The goal of this study was to investigate whether Interactive Voice Response is a technology with which to perform real-time assessments of alcohol consumption and stress. Methods: Fifteen subjects (men and women) were recruited from a previous 4-year intervention study (n = 2,032). The Interactive Voice Response technique was based on mobile telephones. During 1 week, stress and alcohol were measured automatically 3 times daily. In addition, the subjects called the system at the start of the drinking session, and an automated hourly contact was established for the drinking period. Results: Of the data collection calls, 305 (97%) were answered. Real-time drinking was assessed 9 times of 9 (100%). The average length of the IVR... (More)
Background: The goal of this study was to investigate whether Interactive Voice Response is a technology with which to perform real-time assessments of alcohol consumption and stress. Methods: Fifteen subjects (men and women) were recruited from a previous 4-year intervention study (n = 2,032). The Interactive Voice Response technique was based on mobile telephones. During 1 week, stress and alcohol were measured automatically 3 times daily. In addition, the subjects called the system at the start of the drinking session, and an automated hourly contact was established for the drinking period. Results: Of the data collection calls, 305 (97%) were answered. Real-time drinking was assessed 9 times of 9 (100%). The average length of the IVR assessment was only 28 seconds because of modified technology. Individuals with an estimated blood alcohol concentration above 0.1% under-reported drinking in their day-after reports by between 1 and 10 drinks. The same subjects had more pronounced stress reduction than those with lower BAC levels. Conclusion: Interactive Voice Response methodology offers a promising new technology for daily as well as real-time assessments. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
interactive voice response (IVR), assessments, real-time and day-after, stress, methodology, alcohol consumption, mobile (cellular), telephones
in
Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research
volume
31
issue
11
pages
1908 - 1912
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000250249600017
  • scopus:35348965184
ISSN
0145-6008
DOI
10.1111/j.1530-0277.2007.00520.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
052a3277-dca1-4433-88a4-78754d3fcd9f (old id 654421)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=17949395&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-12-05 12:04:29
date last changed
2017-10-08 03:43:26
@article{052a3277-dca1-4433-88a4-78754d3fcd9f,
  abstract     = {Background: The goal of this study was to investigate whether Interactive Voice Response is a technology with which to perform real-time assessments of alcohol consumption and stress. Methods: Fifteen subjects (men and women) were recruited from a previous 4-year intervention study (n = 2,032). The Interactive Voice Response technique was based on mobile telephones. During 1 week, stress and alcohol were measured automatically 3 times daily. In addition, the subjects called the system at the start of the drinking session, and an automated hourly contact was established for the drinking period. Results: Of the data collection calls, 305 (97%) were answered. Real-time drinking was assessed 9 times of 9 (100%). The average length of the IVR assessment was only 28 seconds because of modified technology. Individuals with an estimated blood alcohol concentration above 0.1% under-reported drinking in their day-after reports by between 1 and 10 drinks. The same subjects had more pronounced stress reduction than those with lower BAC levels. Conclusion: Interactive Voice Response methodology offers a promising new technology for daily as well as real-time assessments.},
  author       = {Andersson, Claes and Gordh, Anna H. V. Soederpalm and Berglund, Mats},
  issn         = {0145-6008},
  keyword      = {interactive voice response (IVR),assessments,real-time and day-after,stress,methodology,alcohol consumption,mobile (cellular),telephones},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {11},
  pages        = {1908--1912},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research},
  title        = {Use of real-time interactive voice response in a study of stress and alcohol consumption},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1530-0277.2007.00520.x},
  volume       = {31},
  year         = {2007},
}