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Neurobehavioral deficits in young adult offspring with heightened risk for psychosis who developed schizophrenia-spectrum disorder

Schubert, Erland LU and McNeil, Thomas LU (2007) In Schizophrenia Research 94(1-3). p.107-113
Abstract
Neurobehavioral deficits in neuromotor function, verbal memory, executive function and attention found in patients with schizophrenia and their relatives have been suggested to be liability indicators or predictors of schizophrenia. It remains uncertain which of these neurobehavioral deficits are components of the illness itself or characteristics associated with genetic risk for it. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relation between these neurobehavioral deficits and schizophrenia-spectrum disorder in young adults at genetic risk for psychosis. A 93%-effective follow-up (total n = 166, mean 22.4 yr of age) of a sample longitudinally investigated since fetal age provided complete data for mental disturbance,... (More)
Neurobehavioral deficits in neuromotor function, verbal memory, executive function and attention found in patients with schizophrenia and their relatives have been suggested to be liability indicators or predictors of schizophrenia. It remains uncertain which of these neurobehavioral deficits are components of the illness itself or characteristics associated with genetic risk for it. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relation between these neurobehavioral deficits and schizophrenia-spectrum disorder in young adults at genetic risk for psychosis. A 93%-effective follow-up (total n = 166, mean 22.4 yr of age) of a sample longitudinally investigated since fetal age provided complete data for mental disturbance, neuropsychological performance and neurological abnormality for 74 offspring at increased risk for psychosis (38 offspring of mothers with schizophrenia and 36 offspring of mothers with affective psychosis) and 88 normal-risk offspring. Abnormal glabella reflex and deficits in verbal memory, attention and complex executive functions seem specifically to be related to schizophrenia-spectrum disorder (primarily Cluster A personality disorders) among offspring at genetic risk for psychosis, while neurobehavioral deficits in general characterized offspring at heightened (vs. normal) genetic risk for psychosis, with no relation to schizophrenia-spectrum disorders. The two patterns of neurobehavioral deficits observed here may possibly reflect different causes and different aspects of a deviant neurodevelopmental process, and potentially contribute to a more nuanced version of this all-pervasive (but often non-specific) "model" of schizophrenia's development. (C) 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
genetic, high risk, schizophrenia, neurology, psychosis, neuropsychology, schizophrenia-spectrum
in
Schizophrenia Research
volume
94
issue
1-3
pages
107 - 113
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000248638500014
  • scopus:34447258218
ISSN
0920-9964
DOI
10.1016/j.schres.2007.05.015
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
07a4ccb5-ac08-4b5a-af77-ae76d4013812 (old id 656896)
date added to LUP
2007-12-18 09:23:02
date last changed
2017-01-01 05:04:45
@article{07a4ccb5-ac08-4b5a-af77-ae76d4013812,
  abstract     = {Neurobehavioral deficits in neuromotor function, verbal memory, executive function and attention found in patients with schizophrenia and their relatives have been suggested to be liability indicators or predictors of schizophrenia. It remains uncertain which of these neurobehavioral deficits are components of the illness itself or characteristics associated with genetic risk for it. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relation between these neurobehavioral deficits and schizophrenia-spectrum disorder in young adults at genetic risk for psychosis. A 93%-effective follow-up (total n = 166, mean 22.4 yr of age) of a sample longitudinally investigated since fetal age provided complete data for mental disturbance, neuropsychological performance and neurological abnormality for 74 offspring at increased risk for psychosis (38 offspring of mothers with schizophrenia and 36 offspring of mothers with affective psychosis) and 88 normal-risk offspring. Abnormal glabella reflex and deficits in verbal memory, attention and complex executive functions seem specifically to be related to schizophrenia-spectrum disorder (primarily Cluster A personality disorders) among offspring at genetic risk for psychosis, while neurobehavioral deficits in general characterized offspring at heightened (vs. normal) genetic risk for psychosis, with no relation to schizophrenia-spectrum disorders. The two patterns of neurobehavioral deficits observed here may possibly reflect different causes and different aspects of a deviant neurodevelopmental process, and potentially contribute to a more nuanced version of this all-pervasive (but often non-specific) "model" of schizophrenia's development. (C) 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Schubert, Erland and McNeil, Thomas},
  issn         = {0920-9964},
  keyword      = {genetic,high risk,schizophrenia,neurology,psychosis,neuropsychology,schizophrenia-spectrum},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1-3},
  pages        = {107--113},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Schizophrenia Research},
  title        = {Neurobehavioral deficits in young adult offspring with heightened risk for psychosis who developed schizophrenia-spectrum disorder},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2007.05.015},
  volume       = {94},
  year         = {2007},
}