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Sources of variation in winter basal metabolic rate in the great tit

Broggi, J.; Hohtola, E.; Koivula, K.; Orell, M; Thomson, R. L. and Nilsson, Jan-Åke LU (2007) In Functional Ecology 21(3). p.528-533
Abstract
1. Basal metabolic rate (BMR) is the most widely used standard measurement of the cost of living. Despite the acknowledged phenotypic flexibility of BMR, little is known about the patterns of variation in wild animal populations. 2. We studied the sources of variation in BMR of great tit Parus major (L.) among individuals from two wild populations: Oulu (northern Finland) and Lund (southern Sweden) during six consecutive years. 3. By means of a multivariate approach, we found year, locality, date, previous week average minimum temperature, age, body mass, and the interaction between locality and year were the factors retained in the final model, together explaining 71.1% of the total variation in BMR. 4. Birds from Oulu (n = 168) had a... (More)
1. Basal metabolic rate (BMR) is the most widely used standard measurement of the cost of living. Despite the acknowledged phenotypic flexibility of BMR, little is known about the patterns of variation in wild animal populations. 2. We studied the sources of variation in BMR of great tit Parus major (L.) among individuals from two wild populations: Oulu (northern Finland) and Lund (southern Sweden) during six consecutive years. 3. By means of a multivariate approach, we found year, locality, date, previous week average minimum temperature, age, body mass, and the interaction between locality and year were the factors retained in the final model, together explaining 71.1% of the total variation in BMR. 4. Birds from Oulu (n = 168) had a higher BMR than Lund birds (n = 156), and their BMR varied more between years than that of Lund birds. The two populations reacted in the same way to the other sources of variation examined. 5. Great tits from both populations showed a positive relationship between BMR and body mass and a negative relationship between BMR and date, previous week average minimum temperature and age. 6. This study highlights the need to standardize BMR measurements when testing predictions about metabolic rates from individuals of wild populations. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
interpopulation comparison, energetics, BMR, parus major, age
in
Functional Ecology
volume
21
issue
3
pages
528 - 533
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000246708200015
  • scopus:34249303843
ISSN
1365-2435
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-2435.2007.01255.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b211d28f-2a9d-465e-a181-ae05ea66810a (old id 657838)
date added to LUP
2007-12-11 16:09:12
date last changed
2017-07-09 03:45:25
@article{b211d28f-2a9d-465e-a181-ae05ea66810a,
  abstract     = {1. Basal metabolic rate (BMR) is the most widely used standard measurement of the cost of living. Despite the acknowledged phenotypic flexibility of BMR, little is known about the patterns of variation in wild animal populations. 2. We studied the sources of variation in BMR of great tit Parus major (L.) among individuals from two wild populations: Oulu (northern Finland) and Lund (southern Sweden) during six consecutive years. 3. By means of a multivariate approach, we found year, locality, date, previous week average minimum temperature, age, body mass, and the interaction between locality and year were the factors retained in the final model, together explaining 71.1% of the total variation in BMR. 4. Birds from Oulu (n = 168) had a higher BMR than Lund birds (n = 156), and their BMR varied more between years than that of Lund birds. The two populations reacted in the same way to the other sources of variation examined. 5. Great tits from both populations showed a positive relationship between BMR and body mass and a negative relationship between BMR and date, previous week average minimum temperature and age. 6. This study highlights the need to standardize BMR measurements when testing predictions about metabolic rates from individuals of wild populations.},
  author       = {Broggi, J. and Hohtola, E. and Koivula, K. and Orell, M and Thomson, R. L. and Nilsson, Jan-Åke},
  issn         = {1365-2435},
  keyword      = {interpopulation comparison,energetics,BMR,parus major,age},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {528--533},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Functional Ecology},
  title        = {Sources of variation in winter basal metabolic rate in the great tit},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2435.2007.01255.x},
  volume       = {21},
  year         = {2007},
}