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Computer simulation allows goal-oriented mechanical ventilation in acute respiratory distress syndrome

Uttman, Leif LU ; Ögren, Helena; Niklason, Lisbet LU ; Drefeldt, Björn LU and Jonson, Björn LU (2007) In Critical Care 11(2).
Abstract
Introduction To prevent further lung damage in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome ( ARDS), it is important to avoid overdistension and cyclic opening and closing of atelectatic alveoli. Previous studies have demonstrated protective effects of using low tidal volume ( VT), moderate positive end-expiratory pressure and low airway pressure. Aspiration of dead space ( ASPIDS) allows a reduction in VT by eliminating dead space in the tracheal tube and tubing. We hypothesized that, by applying goal-orientated ventilation based on iterative computer simulation, VT can be reduced at high respiratory rate and much further reduced during ASPIDS without compromising gas exchange or causing high airway pressure. Methods ARDS was induced... (More)
Introduction To prevent further lung damage in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome ( ARDS), it is important to avoid overdistension and cyclic opening and closing of atelectatic alveoli. Previous studies have demonstrated protective effects of using low tidal volume ( VT), moderate positive end-expiratory pressure and low airway pressure. Aspiration of dead space ( ASPIDS) allows a reduction in VT by eliminating dead space in the tracheal tube and tubing. We hypothesized that, by applying goal-orientated ventilation based on iterative computer simulation, VT can be reduced at high respiratory rate and much further reduced during ASPIDS without compromising gas exchange or causing high airway pressure. Methods ARDS was induced in eight pigs by surfactant perturbation and ventilator-induced lung injury. Ventilator resetting guided by computer simulation was then performed, aiming at minimal VT, plateau pressure 30 cmH(2)O and isocapnia, first by only increasing respiratory rate and then by using ASPIDS as well. Results VT decreased from 7.2 +/- 0.5 ml/kg to 6.6 +/- 0.5 ml/kg as respiratory rate increased from 40 to 64 +/- 6 breaths/min, and to 4.0 +/- 0.4 ml/kg when ASPIDS was used at 80 +/- 6 breaths/min. Measured values of arterial carbon dioxide tension were close to predicted values. Without ASPIDS, total positive end-expiratory pressure and plateau pressure were slightly higher than predicted, and with ASPIDS they were lower than predicted. Conclusion In principle, computer simulation may be used in goal-oriented ventilation in ARDS. Further studies are needed to investigate potential benefits and limitations over extended study periods. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Critical Care
volume
11
issue
2
publisher
BioMed Central
external identifiers
  • wos:000247721200006
  • scopus:34147118131
ISSN
1364-8535
DOI
10.1186/cc5719
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
9f6a1e36-1f5f-4e3e-bc22-883db477d811 (old id 659659)
date added to LUP
2007-12-19 11:14:42
date last changed
2017-01-01 05:04:53
@article{9f6a1e36-1f5f-4e3e-bc22-883db477d811,
  abstract     = {Introduction To prevent further lung damage in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome ( ARDS), it is important to avoid overdistension and cyclic opening and closing of atelectatic alveoli. Previous studies have demonstrated protective effects of using low tidal volume ( VT), moderate positive end-expiratory pressure and low airway pressure. Aspiration of dead space ( ASPIDS) allows a reduction in VT by eliminating dead space in the tracheal tube and tubing. We hypothesized that, by applying goal-orientated ventilation based on iterative computer simulation, VT can be reduced at high respiratory rate and much further reduced during ASPIDS without compromising gas exchange or causing high airway pressure. Methods ARDS was induced in eight pigs by surfactant perturbation and ventilator-induced lung injury. Ventilator resetting guided by computer simulation was then performed, aiming at minimal VT, plateau pressure 30 cmH(2)O and isocapnia, first by only increasing respiratory rate and then by using ASPIDS as well. Results VT decreased from 7.2 +/- 0.5 ml/kg to 6.6 +/- 0.5 ml/kg as respiratory rate increased from 40 to 64 +/- 6 breaths/min, and to 4.0 +/- 0.4 ml/kg when ASPIDS was used at 80 +/- 6 breaths/min. Measured values of arterial carbon dioxide tension were close to predicted values. Without ASPIDS, total positive end-expiratory pressure and plateau pressure were slightly higher than predicted, and with ASPIDS they were lower than predicted. Conclusion In principle, computer simulation may be used in goal-oriented ventilation in ARDS. Further studies are needed to investigate potential benefits and limitations over extended study periods.},
  author       = {Uttman, Leif and Ögren, Helena and Niklason, Lisbet and Drefeldt, Björn and Jonson, Björn},
  issn         = {1364-8535},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  publisher    = {BioMed Central},
  series       = {Critical Care},
  title        = {Computer simulation allows goal-oriented mechanical ventilation in acute respiratory distress syndrome},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/cc5719},
  volume       = {11},
  year         = {2007},
}