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FARMFLOW - A dynamic model for phosphorus mass flow, simulating conventional and organic management of a Swedish dairy farm

Modin Edman, Anna-Karin LU ; Oborn, Ingrid and Sverdrup, Harald LU (2007) In Agricultural Systems 94(2). p.431-444
Abstract
A farm systems mass-balance calculation model, FARMFLOW, was applied to a case study comparing organic and conventional management of a Swedish experimental dairy farm, Ojebyn. Parameterisation of the model is implemented using detailed field data from the Ojebyn farm where the two management systems have been run parallel for more than 11 years. Simulations were made to compare the stocks, flows and resulting balances of phosphorus (P) in the two systems during six crop rotations (36 years). In addition, a maximum animal density scenario was tested, in order to analyse the effects of increased production intensity. Results show that FARMFLOW can be a useful tool for analysing the impact of management oil internal farm P dynamics, as well... (More)
A farm systems mass-balance calculation model, FARMFLOW, was applied to a case study comparing organic and conventional management of a Swedish experimental dairy farm, Ojebyn. Parameterisation of the model is implemented using detailed field data from the Ojebyn farm where the two management systems have been run parallel for more than 11 years. Simulations were made to compare the stocks, flows and resulting balances of phosphorus (P) in the two systems during six crop rotations (36 years). In addition, a maximum animal density scenario was tested, in order to analyse the effects of increased production intensity. Results show that FARMFLOW can be a useful tool for analysing the impact of management oil internal farm P dynamics, as well as imports and exports. The organic management results in a higher proportion of internal P flows whereas the conventional system relies more on imports of P in feed and mineral fertilisers. In both management systems, the crop rotation cause large temporal and spatial variation ill the application of manure P to the soil system. The resulting field specific soil P accumulation can indicate which fields to target with changed fertilisation management. In the maximum animal density scenario, both management systems led to an application rate of manure P ill excess of crop demands. (C) 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
management, phosphorus (P), mass-balances, dairy farming
in
Agricultural Systems
volume
94
issue
2
pages
431 - 444
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000246955100027
  • scopus:33947670550
ISSN
0308-521X
DOI
10.1016/j.agsy.2006.11.007
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d647df3c-3801-41b5-8fde-dd7617969c1a (old id 659732)
date added to LUP
2007-12-18 11:23:07
date last changed
2017-07-02 04:22:43
@article{d647df3c-3801-41b5-8fde-dd7617969c1a,
  abstract     = {A farm systems mass-balance calculation model, FARMFLOW, was applied to a case study comparing organic and conventional management of a Swedish experimental dairy farm, Ojebyn. Parameterisation of the model is implemented using detailed field data from the Ojebyn farm where the two management systems have been run parallel for more than 11 years. Simulations were made to compare the stocks, flows and resulting balances of phosphorus (P) in the two systems during six crop rotations (36 years). In addition, a maximum animal density scenario was tested, in order to analyse the effects of increased production intensity. Results show that FARMFLOW can be a useful tool for analysing the impact of management oil internal farm P dynamics, as well as imports and exports. The organic management results in a higher proportion of internal P flows whereas the conventional system relies more on imports of P in feed and mineral fertilisers. In both management systems, the crop rotation cause large temporal and spatial variation ill the application of manure P to the soil system. The resulting field specific soil P accumulation can indicate which fields to target with changed fertilisation management. In the maximum animal density scenario, both management systems led to an application rate of manure P ill excess of crop demands. (C) 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Modin Edman, Anna-Karin and Oborn, Ingrid and Sverdrup, Harald},
  issn         = {0308-521X},
  keyword      = {management,phosphorus (P),mass-balances,dairy farming},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {431--444},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Agricultural Systems},
  title        = {FARMFLOW - A dynamic model for phosphorus mass flow, simulating conventional and organic management of a Swedish dairy farm},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.agsy.2006.11.007},
  volume       = {94},
  year         = {2007},
}