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Female gender is associated with higher incidence and more stable respiratory symptoms during adolescence

Tollefsen, Elin; Langhammer, Arnulf; Romundstad, Pal; Bjermer, Leif LU ; Johnsen, Roar and Holmen, Turid L. (2007) In Respiratory Medicine 101(5). p.896-902
Abstract
Childhood asthma and wheeze is more common among boys than girls, white the opposite is found in adults. The main objective was to study the incidence and the course of wheeze and asthma during adolescence with focus on gender differences. In addition, we explored associations between lifestyle factors at baseline and wheeze at follow-up. A total of 2399 adolescents answered validated questionnaires on respiratory symptoms and lifestyle in 1995-1997 (13-15 years) and at follow-up in 2000-2001 (17-19 years). The risk of reporting wheeze and asthma at follow-up was greater in girls compared to boys among subjects reporting no respiratory symptoms at baseline; Relative risk: 1.4 and 2.4, respectively. More girls than boys reported current... (More)
Childhood asthma and wheeze is more common among boys than girls, white the opposite is found in adults. The main objective was to study the incidence and the course of wheeze and asthma during adolescence with focus on gender differences. In addition, we explored associations between lifestyle factors at baseline and wheeze at follow-up. A total of 2399 adolescents answered validated questionnaires on respiratory symptoms and lifestyle in 1995-1997 (13-15 years) and at follow-up in 2000-2001 (17-19 years). The risk of reporting wheeze and asthma at follow-up was greater in girls compared to boys among subjects reporting no respiratory symptoms at baseline; Relative risk: 1.4 and 2.4, respectively. More girls than boys reported current wheeze at follow-up, both among those with current wheeze (girls 60%, boys 48%) and previous wheeze (girls 33%, boys 28%) at baseline. In girls, development of current wheeze was significantly associated with current smoking (OR = 2.8) and stable current wheeze was significantly associated with overweight (OR = 2.4). Similar associations were not significant in boys. More girls than boys developed wheeze, had stable wheeze or had relapse of previous symptoms during the four year follow-up. The impact of smoking and overweight may put girls at a higher risk of respiratory symptoms than boys. Awareness of the gender difference in respiratory symptoms is important for diagnosis and preventive strategies during adolescence. (C) 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
prospective study, incidence, adolescence, asthma, wheeze
in
Respiratory Medicine
volume
101
issue
5
pages
896 - 902
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000246298800004
  • scopus:34047097821
ISSN
1532-3064
DOI
10.1016/j.rmed.2006.09.022
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
eec67ddd-3a97-4ca1-81bf-b0017a44b258 (old id 661073)
date added to LUP
2007-12-19 16:39:04
date last changed
2017-08-27 05:41:09
@article{eec67ddd-3a97-4ca1-81bf-b0017a44b258,
  abstract     = {Childhood asthma and wheeze is more common among boys than girls, white the opposite is found in adults. The main objective was to study the incidence and the course of wheeze and asthma during adolescence with focus on gender differences. In addition, we explored associations between lifestyle factors at baseline and wheeze at follow-up. A total of 2399 adolescents answered validated questionnaires on respiratory symptoms and lifestyle in 1995-1997 (13-15 years) and at follow-up in 2000-2001 (17-19 years). The risk of reporting wheeze and asthma at follow-up was greater in girls compared to boys among subjects reporting no respiratory symptoms at baseline; Relative risk: 1.4 and 2.4, respectively. More girls than boys reported current wheeze at follow-up, both among those with current wheeze (girls 60%, boys 48%) and previous wheeze (girls 33%, boys 28%) at baseline. In girls, development of current wheeze was significantly associated with current smoking (OR = 2.8) and stable current wheeze was significantly associated with overweight (OR = 2.4). Similar associations were not significant in boys. More girls than boys developed wheeze, had stable wheeze or had relapse of previous symptoms during the four year follow-up. The impact of smoking and overweight may put girls at a higher risk of respiratory symptoms than boys. Awareness of the gender difference in respiratory symptoms is important for diagnosis and preventive strategies during adolescence. (C) 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Tollefsen, Elin and Langhammer, Arnulf and Romundstad, Pal and Bjermer, Leif and Johnsen, Roar and Holmen, Turid L.},
  issn         = {1532-3064},
  keyword      = {prospective study,incidence,adolescence,asthma,wheeze},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {896--902},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Respiratory Medicine},
  title        = {Female gender is associated with higher incidence and more stable respiratory symptoms during adolescence},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.rmed.2006.09.022},
  volume       = {101},
  year         = {2007},
}