Advanced

Apparent Dead Space with the Anesthetic Conserving Device, AnaConDa®: A Clinical and Laboratory Investigation.

Walther Sturesson, Louise LU ; Bodelsson, Mikael LU ; Johansson, Anders LU ; Jonson, Björn LU and Malmkvist, Gunnar LU (2013) In Anesthesia and Analgesia 117(6). p.1319-1324
Abstract
The anesthetic conserving device (ACD) reduces consumption of volatile anesthetic drug by a conserving medium adsorbing exhaled drug during expiration and releasing it during inspiration. Elevated arterial CO2 tension (PaCO2) has been observed in patients using the ACD, despite tidal volume increase to compensate for larger apparatus dead space. In a test lung using room temperature dry gas, this was shown to be due to adsorption of CO2 in the ACD during expiration and release of CO2 during the following inspiration. The effect in the test lung was higher than in patients. We tested the hypothesis that a lesser dead space effect in patients is due to higher temperature and/or moisture attenuating rebreathing of CO2.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Anesthesia and Analgesia
volume
117
issue
6
pages
1319 - 1324
publisher
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
external identifiers
  • pmid:24257381
  • wos:000330437700010
  • scopus:84889072582
ISSN
1526-7598
DOI
10.1213/ANE.0b013e3182a7778e
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
664c22c0-147c-4f11-a5cc-6a31a82b7a30 (old id 4179085)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24257381?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2013-12-02 20:35:52
date last changed
2018-08-05 03:50:16
@article{664c22c0-147c-4f11-a5cc-6a31a82b7a30,
  abstract     = {The anesthetic conserving device (ACD) reduces consumption of volatile anesthetic drug by a conserving medium adsorbing exhaled drug during expiration and releasing it during inspiration. Elevated arterial CO2 tension (PaCO2) has been observed in patients using the ACD, despite tidal volume increase to compensate for larger apparatus dead space. In a test lung using room temperature dry gas, this was shown to be due to adsorption of CO2 in the ACD during expiration and release of CO2 during the following inspiration. The effect in the test lung was higher than in patients. We tested the hypothesis that a lesser dead space effect in patients is due to higher temperature and/or moisture attenuating rebreathing of CO2.},
  author       = {Walther Sturesson, Louise and Bodelsson, Mikael and Johansson, Anders and Jonson, Björn and Malmkvist, Gunnar},
  issn         = {1526-7598},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {1319--1324},
  publisher    = {Lippincott Williams & Wilkins},
  series       = {Anesthesia and Analgesia},
  title        = {Apparent Dead Space with the Anesthetic Conserving Device, AnaConDa®: A Clinical and Laboratory Investigation.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1213/ANE.0b013e3182a7778e},
  volume       = {117},
  year         = {2013},
}