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Effects of various protective clothing and thermal environments on heat strain of unacclimated men: The PHS (predicted heat strain) model revisited

Wang, Faming LU ; Gao, Chuansi LU ; Kuklane, Kalev LU and Holmér, Ingvar LU (2013) In Industrial Health 51(3). p.266-274
Abstract
Five protective garments were assessed on eight unacclimated male subjects at two WBGT temperatures: 19.0 and 24.5 °C. The thermophysiological responses and subjective sensations were reported. The PHS model (ISO7933) was used for predicting thermophysiological responses for each testing scenario. It was found that there were significant differences between clothing FIRE and other clothing on thermal sensation (p<0.05). Significant differences were found on skin humidity sensation between FIRE and L, HV or MIL (p<0.001). The RPE value in FIRE is significant different with L and HV (p<0.05). At 19.0 °C WBGT, the post-exercise mean skin temperatures increased by 0.59 and 1.29 °C in MIL and CLM. In contrast, mean skin temperatures in... (More)
Five protective garments were assessed on eight unacclimated male subjects at two WBGT temperatures: 19.0 and 24.5 °C. The thermophysiological responses and subjective sensations were reported. The PHS model (ISO7933) was used for predicting thermophysiological responses for each testing scenario. It was found that there were significant differences between clothing FIRE and other clothing on thermal sensation (p<0.05). Significant differences were found on skin humidity sensation between FIRE and L, HV or MIL (p<0.001). The RPE value in FIRE is significant different with L and HV (p<0.05). At 19.0 °C WBGT, the post-exercise mean skin temperatures increased by 0.59 and 1.29 °C in MIL and CLM. In contrast, mean skin temperatures in L, HV, MIL, CLM and FIRE at WBGT=24.5 oC increased by 1.7, 2.1, 2.1, 2.8 and 3.3 °C, respectively. The PHS model presented good performance on predicted mean skin temperatures in MIL and CLM at both two thermal environments. However, the skin temperature prediction with light clothing in high humidity (RH> 80%) was weak. For thick protective clothing, the prediction on rectal temperature was greatly conservative. It is thus concluded that the PHS model is inapplicable for high insulating clothing and measurements performed in high humidity environments. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
heat stress, heat strain, WBGT, PHS model, thermophysiological response, protective clothing
in
Industrial Health
volume
51
issue
3
pages
266 - 274
publisher
National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, Japan
external identifiers
  • wos:000319786800004
  • scopus:84883399860
ISSN
1880-8026
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
66d4769f-beea-4885-9eec-15d929157595 (old id 2968198)
alternative location
http://www.jniosh.go.jp/en/indu_hel/pdf/IH_51_3_266.pdf
date added to LUP
2012-08-22 10:51:44
date last changed
2019-07-09 01:05:46
@article{66d4769f-beea-4885-9eec-15d929157595,
  abstract     = {Five protective garments were assessed on eight unacclimated male subjects at two WBGT temperatures: 19.0 and 24.5 °C. The thermophysiological responses and subjective sensations were reported. The PHS model (ISO7933) was used for predicting thermophysiological responses for each testing scenario. It was found that there were significant differences between clothing FIRE and other clothing on thermal sensation (p&lt;0.05). Significant differences were found on skin humidity sensation between FIRE and L, HV or MIL (p&lt;0.001). The RPE value in FIRE is significant different with L and HV (p&lt;0.05). At 19.0 °C WBGT, the post-exercise mean skin temperatures increased by 0.59 and 1.29 °C in MIL and CLM. In contrast, mean skin temperatures in L, HV, MIL, CLM and FIRE at WBGT=24.5 oC increased by 1.7, 2.1, 2.1, 2.8 and 3.3 °C, respectively. The PHS model presented good performance on predicted mean skin temperatures in MIL and CLM at both two thermal environments. However, the skin temperature prediction with light clothing in high humidity (RH&gt; 80%) was weak. For thick protective clothing, the prediction on rectal temperature was greatly conservative. It is thus concluded that the PHS model is inapplicable for high insulating clothing and measurements performed in high humidity environments.},
  author       = {Wang, Faming and Gao, Chuansi and Kuklane, Kalev and Holmér, Ingvar},
  issn         = {1880-8026},
  keyword      = {heat stress,heat strain,WBGT,PHS model,thermophysiological response,protective clothing},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {266--274},
  publisher    = {National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, Japan},
  series       = {Industrial Health},
  title        = {Effects of various protective clothing and thermal environments on heat strain of unacclimated men: The PHS (predicted heat strain) model revisited},
  volume       = {51},
  year         = {2013},
}