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Tumor-directed immunotherapy can generate tumor-specific T cell responses through localized co-stimulation

Ellmark, Peter LU ; Mangsbo, Sara M.; Furebring, Christina LU ; Norlén, Per LU and Tötterman, Thomas H. (2017) In Cancer Immunology and Immunotherapy 66(1). p.1-7
Abstract

The most important goals for the field of immuno-oncology are to improve the response rate and increase the number of tumor indications that respond to immunotherapy, without increasing adverse side effects. One approach to achieve these goals is to use tumor-directed immunotherapy, i.e., to focus the immune activation to the most relevant part of the immune system. This may improve anti-tumor efficacy as well as reduce immune-related adverse events. Tumor-directed immune activation can be achieved by local injections of immune modulators in the tumor area or by directing the immune modulator to the tumor using bispecific antibodies. In this review, we focus on therapies targeting checkpoint inhibitors and co-stimulatory receptors that... (More)

The most important goals for the field of immuno-oncology are to improve the response rate and increase the number of tumor indications that respond to immunotherapy, without increasing adverse side effects. One approach to achieve these goals is to use tumor-directed immunotherapy, i.e., to focus the immune activation to the most relevant part of the immune system. This may improve anti-tumor efficacy as well as reduce immune-related adverse events. Tumor-directed immune activation can be achieved by local injections of immune modulators in the tumor area or by directing the immune modulator to the tumor using bispecific antibodies. In this review, we focus on therapies targeting checkpoint inhibitors and co-stimulatory receptors that can generate tumor-specific T cell responses through localized immune activation.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Bispecific antibody, Cancer, Immuno-oncology, Immunotherapy, Intratumoral, Tumor-directed immunotherapy
in
Cancer Immunology and Immunotherapy
volume
66
issue
1
pages
7 pages
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • scopus:84990818472
  • wos:000393598500001
ISSN
0340-7004
DOI
10.1007/s00262-016-1909-3
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
670bdd48-fc94-4de2-98cf-f11fe6fc9190
date added to LUP
2016-11-16 08:18:22
date last changed
2018-01-07 11:35:22
@article{670bdd48-fc94-4de2-98cf-f11fe6fc9190,
  abstract     = {<p>The most important goals for the field of immuno-oncology are to improve the response rate and increase the number of tumor indications that respond to immunotherapy, without increasing adverse side effects. One approach to achieve these goals is to use tumor-directed immunotherapy, i.e., to focus the immune activation to the most relevant part of the immune system. This may improve anti-tumor efficacy as well as reduce immune-related adverse events. Tumor-directed immune activation can be achieved by local injections of immune modulators in the tumor area or by directing the immune modulator to the tumor using bispecific antibodies. In this review, we focus on therapies targeting checkpoint inhibitors and co-stimulatory receptors that can generate tumor-specific T cell responses through localized immune activation.</p>},
  author       = {Ellmark, Peter and Mangsbo, Sara M. and Furebring, Christina and Norlén, Per and Tötterman, Thomas H.},
  issn         = {0340-7004},
  keyword      = {Bispecific antibody,Cancer,Immuno-oncology,Immunotherapy,Intratumoral,Tumor-directed immunotherapy},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {1--7},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Cancer Immunology and Immunotherapy},
  title        = {Tumor-directed immunotherapy can generate tumor-specific T cell responses through localized co-stimulation},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00262-016-1909-3},
  volume       = {66},
  year         = {2017},
}