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Granulocyte, monocyte/macrophage apheresis for inflammatory bowel disease: The first 100 patients treated in Scandinavia

Ljung, Tryggve; Thomsen, Ole Ostergaard; Vatn, Morten; Karlen, Per; Karlsen, Lars Norman; Tysk, Curt; Nilsson, Stefan U.; Kilander, Anders; Gillberg, Rolf and Grip, Olof LU , et al. (2007) In Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology 42(2). p.221-227
Abstract
Objective. Selective leukocyte apheresis is a new type of non-pharmacological treatment for patients with active ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Preliminary data have indicated that this type of therapy is safe and efficacious, and large sham-controlled studies are currently in progress. In Scandinavia, a substantial number of patients with chronic inflammatory bowel disease have already received leukocyte apheresis on a compassionate use basis and the aim of this study was to report the clinical outcome and adverse events in the first patients treated. Material and methods. Clinical details of the first consecutive 100 patients with inflammatory bowel disease treated with granulocyte, mono cyte/macrophage (Adacolumn) apheresis in... (More)
Objective. Selective leukocyte apheresis is a new type of non-pharmacological treatment for patients with active ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Preliminary data have indicated that this type of therapy is safe and efficacious, and large sham-controlled studies are currently in progress. In Scandinavia, a substantial number of patients with chronic inflammatory bowel disease have already received leukocyte apheresis on a compassionate use basis and the aim of this study was to report the clinical outcome and adverse events in the first patients treated. Material and methods. Clinical details of the first consecutive 100 patients with inflammatory bowel disease treated with granulocyte, mono cyte/macrophage (Adacolumn) apheresis in Scandinavia were prospectively registered. Median length of follow-up was 17 months, (range 5-30). Results. The study population comprised 52 patients with ulcerative colitis, 44 patients with Crohn's disease and 4 patients with indeterminate colitis. In 97 patients the indication for Adacolumn treatment was steroid-refractory or steroid-dependent disease. Clinical remission was attained in 48% of the patients with ulcerative colitis, and an additional 27% had a clinical response to the apheresis treatment. The corresponding figures for patients with Crohn's disease were 41% and 23%, respectively. Complete steroid withdrawal was achieved in 27 out of the 50 patients taking corticosteroids at baseline. Adverse events were reported in 15 patients and headache was most frequently reported (n=7). Conclusions. Granulocyte, mono cyte/macrophage apheresis treatment seems to be a valuable adjuvant therapy in selected patients with refractory inflammatory bowel disease. The risk for toxicity or severe adverse events appears to be low. (Less)
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
inflammatory bowel disease, ulcerative colitis, leukocytes, Crohn's disease, apheresis
in
Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology
volume
42
issue
2
pages
221 - 227
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000244528500012
  • scopus:33846979425
ISSN
1502-7708
DOI
10.1080/00365520600979369
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
85b2cec9-7566-44f0-a411-247578e9d64a (old id 671947)
date added to LUP
2007-12-13 09:31:09
date last changed
2017-01-01 07:20:20
@article{85b2cec9-7566-44f0-a411-247578e9d64a,
  abstract     = {Objective. Selective leukocyte apheresis is a new type of non-pharmacological treatment for patients with active ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Preliminary data have indicated that this type of therapy is safe and efficacious, and large sham-controlled studies are currently in progress. In Scandinavia, a substantial number of patients with chronic inflammatory bowel disease have already received leukocyte apheresis on a compassionate use basis and the aim of this study was to report the clinical outcome and adverse events in the first patients treated. Material and methods. Clinical details of the first consecutive 100 patients with inflammatory bowel disease treated with granulocyte, mono cyte/macrophage (Adacolumn) apheresis in Scandinavia were prospectively registered. Median length of follow-up was 17 months, (range 5-30). Results. The study population comprised 52 patients with ulcerative colitis, 44 patients with Crohn's disease and 4 patients with indeterminate colitis. In 97 patients the indication for Adacolumn treatment was steroid-refractory or steroid-dependent disease. Clinical remission was attained in 48% of the patients with ulcerative colitis, and an additional 27% had a clinical response to the apheresis treatment. The corresponding figures for patients with Crohn's disease were 41% and 23%, respectively. Complete steroid withdrawal was achieved in 27 out of the 50 patients taking corticosteroids at baseline. Adverse events were reported in 15 patients and headache was most frequently reported (n=7). Conclusions. Granulocyte, mono cyte/macrophage apheresis treatment seems to be a valuable adjuvant therapy in selected patients with refractory inflammatory bowel disease. The risk for toxicity or severe adverse events appears to be low.},
  author       = {Ljung, Tryggve and Thomsen, Ole Ostergaard and Vatn, Morten and Karlen, Per and Karlsen, Lars Norman and Tysk, Curt and Nilsson, Stefan U. and Kilander, Anders and Gillberg, Rolf and Grip, Olof and Lindgren, Stefan and Befrits, Ragnar and Lofberg, Robert},
  issn         = {1502-7708},
  keyword      = {inflammatory bowel disease,ulcerative colitis,leukocytes,Crohn's disease,apheresis},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {221--227},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology},
  title        = {Granulocyte, monocyte/macrophage apheresis for inflammatory bowel disease: The first 100 patients treated in Scandinavia},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00365520600979369},
  volume       = {42},
  year         = {2007},
}