Advanced

Refill non-adherence to repeat prescriptions leads to treatment gaps or to high extra costs

Krigsman, Kristin; Melander, Arne LU ; Carlsten, Anders; Ekedahl, Anders and Nilsson, J. Lars G. (2007) In PHARMACY WORLD & SCIENCE 29(1). p.19-24
Abstract
Objective: To determine the nature and extent of undersupply and the economic consequences of oversupply of medication among non-adherent patients. Methods: This study used copies of repeat prescriptions (=multiple dispensations), collected during 1 week in 2002 at 16 Swedish community pharmacies. For patients with a refill adherence below 80%, treatment gaps were defined as the number of days they had no drug available. The cost of drug oversupply (i.e., refill adherence > 120%) was calculated from the prices of the drug packages dispensed. Results: The number of collected repeat prescriptions was 3,636. The median of treatment gaps among patients with a refill adherence below 80% was 53 days per 90-100 days treatment period and the... (More)
Objective: To determine the nature and extent of undersupply and the economic consequences of oversupply of medication among non-adherent patients. Methods: This study used copies of repeat prescriptions (=multiple dispensations), collected during 1 week in 2002 at 16 Swedish community pharmacies. For patients with a refill adherence below 80%, treatment gaps were defined as the number of days they had no drug available. The cost of drug oversupply (i.e., refill adherence > 120%) was calculated from the prices of the drug packages dispensed. Results: The number of collected repeat prescriptions was 3,636. The median of treatment gaps among patients with a refill adherence below 80% was 53 days per 90-100 days treatment period and the corresponding median for oversupply was 40 days. The cost of oversupply for exempt patients (i.e., patients who have paid 1,800 SEK (196 euro; US$ 243) per year for medicines) was 32,000 SEK (3,500 euro; US$ 4,300) higher than for non-exempt patients. An extrapolation to all Sweden indicates that exemption from charges leads to an additional oversupply of about 142 million SEK (15 million euro; US$ 19 million) per year above that of non-exempt patients. Conclusion: Both undersupply and oversupply of prescribed medicines are common in Sweden. Patients with a refill adherence below 80% seem to have less than half of the prescribed treatment available. Oversupply or drug stockpiling occurs more frequently among exempt than among non-exempt patients, and this oversupply leads to high unnecessary costs. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
repeat, refill adherence, oversupply, costs, exemption from charges, prescriptions, treatment gaps, undersupply
in
PHARMACY WORLD & SCIENCE
volume
29
issue
1
pages
19 - 24
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000244316600004
  • scopus:33847153070
ISSN
0928-1231
DOI
10.1007/s11096-005-4797-8
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e49d10bf-a1c5-4fcb-bf24-2122b14946bc (old id 674086)
date added to LUP
2007-12-12 09:30:57
date last changed
2017-01-01 07:10:05
@article{e49d10bf-a1c5-4fcb-bf24-2122b14946bc,
  abstract     = {Objective: To determine the nature and extent of undersupply and the economic consequences of oversupply of medication among non-adherent patients. Methods: This study used copies of repeat prescriptions (=multiple dispensations), collected during 1 week in 2002 at 16 Swedish community pharmacies. For patients with a refill adherence below 80%, treatment gaps were defined as the number of days they had no drug available. The cost of drug oversupply (i.e., refill adherence > 120%) was calculated from the prices of the drug packages dispensed. Results: The number of collected repeat prescriptions was 3,636. The median of treatment gaps among patients with a refill adherence below 80% was 53 days per 90-100 days treatment period and the corresponding median for oversupply was 40 days. The cost of oversupply for exempt patients (i.e., patients who have paid 1,800 SEK (196 euro; US$ 243) per year for medicines) was 32,000 SEK (3,500 euro; US$ 4,300) higher than for non-exempt patients. An extrapolation to all Sweden indicates that exemption from charges leads to an additional oversupply of about 142 million SEK (15 million euro; US$ 19 million) per year above that of non-exempt patients. Conclusion: Both undersupply and oversupply of prescribed medicines are common in Sweden. Patients with a refill adherence below 80% seem to have less than half of the prescribed treatment available. Oversupply or drug stockpiling occurs more frequently among exempt than among non-exempt patients, and this oversupply leads to high unnecessary costs.},
  author       = {Krigsman, Kristin and Melander, Arne and Carlsten, Anders and Ekedahl, Anders and Nilsson, J. Lars G.},
  issn         = {0928-1231},
  keyword      = {repeat,refill adherence,oversupply,costs,exemption from charges,prescriptions,treatment gaps,undersupply},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {19--24},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {PHARMACY WORLD & SCIENCE},
  title        = {Refill non-adherence to repeat prescriptions leads to treatment gaps or to high extra costs},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11096-005-4797-8},
  volume       = {29},
  year         = {2007},
}