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Oxidative stress decreases extracellular homocysteine concentration in human hepatoma (HepG2) cell cultures

Hultberg, Malin LU and Hultberg, Björn LU (2007) In Chemico-Biological Interactions 165(1). p.54-58
Abstract
Background: Mild hyperhomocysteinemia is associated with premature vascular disease. The mechanism behind the vascular injuries is, however, still unknown. Homocysteine may be catabolized in the trans sulfuration pathway to cysteine. Cystathionine beta-synthase, which catalyses the first step in the transsulfuration pathway is redox-sensitive. We have therefore investigated total extracellular homocysteine turnover in the presence of oxidative stress in human cell lines. Methods: The turnover of total extracellular homocysteine in HeLa and hepatoma cell cultures has been investigated in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Furthermore, the effect of hydrogen peroxide on the removal of high amounts of exogenously added homocysteine was also... (More)
Background: Mild hyperhomocysteinemia is associated with premature vascular disease. The mechanism behind the vascular injuries is, however, still unknown. Homocysteine may be catabolized in the trans sulfuration pathway to cysteine. Cystathionine beta-synthase, which catalyses the first step in the transsulfuration pathway is redox-sensitive. We have therefore investigated total extracellular homocysteine turnover in the presence of oxidative stress in human cell lines. Methods: The turnover of total extracellular homocysteine in HeLa and hepatoma cell cultures has been investigated in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Furthermore, the effect of hydrogen peroxide on the removal of high amounts of exogenously added homocysteine was also studied. Results: Total extracellular homocysteine concentration in hepatoma cell cultures decreased in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, whereas the extracellular homocysteine concentration in HeLa cell cultures was not influenced. There was no significant change of intracellular homocysteine in any type of cell cultures. Furthermore, the presence of hydrogen peroxide did not increase the removal of exogenously added homocysteine. Conclusion: The presence of hydrogen peroxide probably increases the activity of the transsulfuration pathway in hepatoma cell cultures, which increases the intracellular use of homocysteine and lowers its extracellular release. Consequently this mechanism might tend to lower total plasma homocysteine concentration in oxidative stress. (c) 2006 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
transsulfuration, hydrogen peroxide, hepatoma cell lines, homocysteine, HeLa cell lines
in
Chemico-Biological Interactions
volume
165
issue
1
pages
54 - 58
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000243776000006
  • scopus:33845654437
ISSN
1872-7786
DOI
10.1016/j.cbi.2006.10.009
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
cd100789-0873-4dc0-b7a6-290e14e127d1 (old id 676400)
date added to LUP
2007-12-11 12:22:02
date last changed
2017-01-01 07:03:10
@article{cd100789-0873-4dc0-b7a6-290e14e127d1,
  abstract     = {Background: Mild hyperhomocysteinemia is associated with premature vascular disease. The mechanism behind the vascular injuries is, however, still unknown. Homocysteine may be catabolized in the trans sulfuration pathway to cysteine. Cystathionine beta-synthase, which catalyses the first step in the transsulfuration pathway is redox-sensitive. We have therefore investigated total extracellular homocysteine turnover in the presence of oxidative stress in human cell lines. Methods: The turnover of total extracellular homocysteine in HeLa and hepatoma cell cultures has been investigated in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Furthermore, the effect of hydrogen peroxide on the removal of high amounts of exogenously added homocysteine was also studied. Results: Total extracellular homocysteine concentration in hepatoma cell cultures decreased in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, whereas the extracellular homocysteine concentration in HeLa cell cultures was not influenced. There was no significant change of intracellular homocysteine in any type of cell cultures. Furthermore, the presence of hydrogen peroxide did not increase the removal of exogenously added homocysteine. Conclusion: The presence of hydrogen peroxide probably increases the activity of the transsulfuration pathway in hepatoma cell cultures, which increases the intracellular use of homocysteine and lowers its extracellular release. Consequently this mechanism might tend to lower total plasma homocysteine concentration in oxidative stress. (c) 2006 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Hultberg, Malin and Hultberg, Björn},
  issn         = {1872-7786},
  keyword      = {transsulfuration,hydrogen peroxide,hepatoma cell lines,homocysteine,HeLa cell lines},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {54--58},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Chemico-Biological Interactions},
  title        = {Oxidative stress decreases extracellular homocysteine concentration in human hepatoma (HepG2) cell cultures},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cbi.2006.10.009},
  volume       = {165},
  year         = {2007},
}