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Interpretation of serological complement biomarkers in disease

Ekdahl, Kristina N.; Persson, Barbro; Mohlin, Camilla; Sandholm, Kerstin; Skattum, Lillemor LU and Nilsson, Bo (2018) In Frontiers in Immunology 9(OCT).
Abstract

Complement system aberrations have been identified as pathophysiological mechanisms in a number of diseases and pathological conditions either directly or indirectly. Examples of such conditions include infections, inflammation, autoimmune disease, as well as allogeneic and xenogenic transplantation. Both prospective and retrospective studies have demonstrated significant complementrelated differences between patient groups and controls. However, due to the low degree of specificity and sensitivity of some of the assays used, it is not always possible to make predictions regarding the complement status of individual patients. Today, there are three main indications for determination of a patient's complement status: (1) complement... (More)

Complement system aberrations have been identified as pathophysiological mechanisms in a number of diseases and pathological conditions either directly or indirectly. Examples of such conditions include infections, inflammation, autoimmune disease, as well as allogeneic and xenogenic transplantation. Both prospective and retrospective studies have demonstrated significant complementrelated differences between patient groups and controls. However, due to the low degree of specificity and sensitivity of some of the assays used, it is not always possible to make predictions regarding the complement status of individual patients. Today, there are three main indications for determination of a patient's complement status: (1) complement deficiencies (acquired or inherited); (2) disorders with aberrant complement activation; and (3) C1 inhibitor deficiencies (acquired or inherited). An additional indication is to monitor patients on complement-regulating drugs, an indication which may be expected to increase in the near future since there is now a number of such drugs either under development, already in clinical trials or in clinical use. Available techniques to study complement include quantification of: (1) individual components; (2) activation products, (3) function, and (4) autoantibodies to complement proteins. In this review, we summarize the appropriate indications, techniques, and interpretations of basic serological complement analyses, exemplified by a number of clinical disorders.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Activation products, Complement, Complement regulatory drugs, Deficiency, Functional test
in
Frontiers in Immunology
volume
9
issue
OCT
publisher
Frontiers Media S. A.
external identifiers
  • scopus:85055834488
ISSN
1664-3224
DOI
10.3389/fimmu.2018.02237
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
67799e46-cef1-4f7d-93af-068e686ecb8a
date added to LUP
2018-11-15 12:11:01
date last changed
2019-03-19 04:02:31
@article{67799e46-cef1-4f7d-93af-068e686ecb8a,
  abstract     = {<p>Complement system aberrations have been identified as pathophysiological mechanisms in a number of diseases and pathological conditions either directly or indirectly. Examples of such conditions include infections, inflammation, autoimmune disease, as well as allogeneic and xenogenic transplantation. Both prospective and retrospective studies have demonstrated significant complementrelated differences between patient groups and controls. However, due to the low degree of specificity and sensitivity of some of the assays used, it is not always possible to make predictions regarding the complement status of individual patients. Today, there are three main indications for determination of a patient's complement status: (1) complement deficiencies (acquired or inherited); (2) disorders with aberrant complement activation; and (3) C1 inhibitor deficiencies (acquired or inherited). An additional indication is to monitor patients on complement-regulating drugs, an indication which may be expected to increase in the near future since there is now a number of such drugs either under development, already in clinical trials or in clinical use. Available techniques to study complement include quantification of: (1) individual components; (2) activation products, (3) function, and (4) autoantibodies to complement proteins. In this review, we summarize the appropriate indications, techniques, and interpretations of basic serological complement analyses, exemplified by a number of clinical disorders.</p>},
  articleno    = {02237},
  author       = {Ekdahl, Kristina N. and Persson, Barbro and Mohlin, Camilla and Sandholm, Kerstin and Skattum, Lillemor and Nilsson, Bo},
  issn         = {1664-3224},
  keyword      = {Activation products,Complement,Complement regulatory drugs,Deficiency,Functional test},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {OCT},
  publisher    = {Frontiers Media S. A.},
  series       = {Frontiers in Immunology},
  title        = {Interpretation of serological complement biomarkers in disease},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fimmu.2018.02237},
  volume       = {9},
  year         = {2018},
}