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The “Managing Fatigue” programme for people with multiple sclerosis–acceptance and feasibility with Swedish occupational therapists

Månsson Lexell, Eva LU ; Haglund, Lena and Packer, Tanya (2020) In Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy 27(7). p.536-549
Abstract

Background: Fatigue is common among people with multiple sclerosis (MS), and significantly influences engagement in occupations. The Managing Fatigue (MF) programme is an evidence-based occupational therapy group-based intervention, utilising self-management science that provides people with tools to manage fatigue. Although the national MS-guidelines in Sweden cite this as best practice, a Swedish version is not available. Aim: To translate and investigate the feasibility of a Swedish MF programme delivered by occupational therapists working with MS clients in Sweden. Material and methods: We used a mixed-methods design. Eight recruited occupational therapists, participated in a workshop prior to delivering the MF programme. Following... (More)

Background: Fatigue is common among people with multiple sclerosis (MS), and significantly influences engagement in occupations. The Managing Fatigue (MF) programme is an evidence-based occupational therapy group-based intervention, utilising self-management science that provides people with tools to manage fatigue. Although the national MS-guidelines in Sweden cite this as best practice, a Swedish version is not available. Aim: To translate and investigate the feasibility of a Swedish MF programme delivered by occupational therapists working with MS clients in Sweden. Material and methods: We used a mixed-methods design. Eight recruited occupational therapists, participated in a workshop prior to delivering the MF programme. Following programme delivery, they completed a questionnaire and participated in focus group interviews. Results: Each therapist conducted one programme with 5–9 MS clients. Overall, therapists were satisfied with programme content, and delivery was followed. Minor improvements were suggested, specifically in relation to how cognitive fatigue can be managed. Therapists acknowledged challenges moving from “expert” to supporting self-management. Conclusion: The MF programme is feasible in Sweden, and its client-centred and occupation focus is consistent with therapists’ scope of practice. In the future, acceptability and satisfaction from the perspectives of MS participants should be examined. Larger, more robust intervention studies evaluating effectiveness are also warranted.

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author
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publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Collaboration, communication, fatigue, group intervention, occupational performance, self-management
in
Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy
volume
27
issue
7
pages
14 pages
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • pmid:31282796
  • scopus:85068657549
ISSN
1103-8128
DOI
10.1080/11038128.2019.1634149
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
67c848c5-008d-4df4-8cb4-7fb95622d92c
date added to LUP
2019-07-24 11:03:02
date last changed
2021-01-06 07:24:26
@article{67c848c5-008d-4df4-8cb4-7fb95622d92c,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: Fatigue is common among people with multiple sclerosis (MS), and significantly influences engagement in occupations. The Managing Fatigue (MF) programme is an evidence-based occupational therapy group-based intervention, utilising self-management science that provides people with tools to manage fatigue. Although the national MS-guidelines in Sweden cite this as best practice, a Swedish version is not available. Aim: To translate and investigate the feasibility of a Swedish MF programme delivered by occupational therapists working with MS clients in Sweden. Material and methods: We used a mixed-methods design. Eight recruited occupational therapists, participated in a workshop prior to delivering the MF programme. Following programme delivery, they completed a questionnaire and participated in focus group interviews. Results: Each therapist conducted one programme with 5–9 MS clients. Overall, therapists were satisfied with programme content, and delivery was followed. Minor improvements were suggested, specifically in relation to how cognitive fatigue can be managed. Therapists acknowledged challenges moving from “expert” to supporting self-management. Conclusion: The MF programme is feasible in Sweden, and its client-centred and occupation focus is consistent with therapists’ scope of practice. In the future, acceptability and satisfaction from the perspectives of MS participants should be examined. Larger, more robust intervention studies evaluating effectiveness are also warranted.</p>},
  author       = {Månsson Lexell, Eva and Haglund, Lena and Packer, Tanya},
  issn         = {1103-8128},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {536--549},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy},
  title        = {The “Managing Fatigue” programme for people with multiple sclerosis–acceptance and feasibility with Swedish occupational therapists},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/11038128.2019.1634149},
  doi          = {10.1080/11038128.2019.1634149},
  volume       = {27},
  year         = {2020},
}