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Ethical Considerations in Nutrigenetics and Nutrigenomics

Görman, Ulf LU ; Ahlgren, Jennie LU and Nordström, Karin LU (2020) p.543-548
Abstract
Ethics is the study of the normative dimensions of human relations and experiences. This chapter discusses such questions in relation to basic values in modern society. The normative foundations for the analysis are the values of human dignity, autonomy, freedom, equality, and solidarity, as well as the responsibilities of society toward its citizens, including freedom, security, and justice. The questions that are brought up touch on how implementing nutrigenetics and nutrigenomics in personalized nutrition services relates to these values.

Health and food are primary human needs. The choice of food can contribute to the support of health, but it can also come into conflict with health. Personalized nutrition may be seen as part... (More)
Ethics is the study of the normative dimensions of human relations and experiences. This chapter discusses such questions in relation to basic values in modern society. The normative foundations for the analysis are the values of human dignity, autonomy, freedom, equality, and solidarity, as well as the responsibilities of society toward its citizens, including freedom, security, and justice. The questions that are brought up touch on how implementing nutrigenetics and nutrigenomics in personalized nutrition services relates to these values.

Health and food are primary human needs. The choice of food can contribute to the support of health, but it can also come into conflict with health. Personalized nutrition may be seen as part of a wider trend toward early preventive actions to treat susceptibility to disease. If personalization of nutrition can contribute to eating habits that support health instead of threatening it, this will be beneficial for the individual, but it may also be good for society as a whole. As a consequence, pressure on societal expenses for health care may be reduced.

Personalized nutrition, as well as the wider concept of precision nutrition, have stimulated expectations and are often described as having great potential, but it has also been difficult to realize them. Studies indicate that there is widespread optimism among researchers engaged in nutrigenetics and nutrigenomics regarding at least its long-term benefits, whereas there are divergent viewpoints within the wider research community. In this situation, ethical concerns need to receive attention. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Direct-to-consumer services, Human dignity, Personalized nutrition, Precision nutrition
host publication
Principles of Nutrigenetics and Nutrigenomics
editor
De Caterina, Raffaele; Martinez, J. Alfredo; Kohlmeier, Martin; ; and
pages
543 - 548
publisher
Academic Press
ISBN
9780128045879
9780128045725
DOI
10.1016/B978-0-12-804572-5.00072-0
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
690b8e18-b302-4307-937f-7789c299c2f9
date added to LUP
2019-10-07 09:18:10
date last changed
2019-10-07 09:18:10
@inbook{690b8e18-b302-4307-937f-7789c299c2f9,
  abstract     = {Ethics is the study of the normative dimensions of human relations and experiences. This chapter discusses such questions in relation to basic values in modern society. The normative foundations for the analysis are the values of human dignity, autonomy, freedom, equality, and solidarity, as well as the responsibilities of society toward its citizens, including freedom, security, and justice. The questions that are brought up touch on how implementing nutrigenetics and nutrigenomics in personalized nutrition services relates to these values.<br/><br/>Health and food are primary human needs. The choice of food can contribute to the support of health, but it can also come into conflict with health. Personalized nutrition may be seen as part of a wider trend toward early preventive actions to treat susceptibility to disease. If personalization of nutrition can contribute to eating habits that support health instead of threatening it, this will be beneficial for the individual, but it may also be good for society as a whole. As a consequence, pressure on societal expenses for health care may be reduced.<br/><br/>Personalized nutrition, as well as the wider concept of precision nutrition, have stimulated expectations and are often described as having great potential, but it has also been difficult to realize them. Studies indicate that there is widespread optimism among researchers engaged in nutrigenetics and nutrigenomics regarding at least its long-term benefits, whereas there are divergent viewpoints within the wider research community. In this situation, ethical concerns need to receive attention.},
  author       = {Görman, Ulf and Ahlgren, Jennie and Nordström, Karin},
  editor       = {De Caterina, Raffaele and Martinez, J. Alfredo and Kohlmeier, Martin},
  isbn         = {9780128045879 },
  keyword      = {Direct-to-consumer services,Human dignity,Personalized nutrition,Precision nutrition},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {543--548},
  publisher    = {Academic Press},
  title        = {Ethical Considerations in Nutrigenetics and Nutrigenomics},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-804572-5.00072-0},
  year         = {2020},
}