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Trends in prevalence of fatal surgical diseases at forensic autopsy

Acosta, Stefan LU and Krantz, Peter LU (2007) In ANZ Journal of Surgery 77(9). p.718-721
Abstract
Background: In 1992, there were major changes in Swedish law of the deceased, which had led to a dramatic decrease in autopsy rates. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of fatal or potential fatal surgical diseases within a Swedish forensic autopsy cohort, before and after this change in legislation. Methods: Deaths referred for forensic autopsy at the Institution of Forensic Medicine, Lund University Hospital, Sweden, between 1970-1982 and 2000-2004, were studied regarding the prevalence of aorto-iliac diseases, acute abdomen and abdominal cancer. Results: The forensic autopsy rates in the population during the two time periods were 14.0% (29 399 patients) and 5.3% (4487 patients), respectively. The total prevalence of... (More)
Background: In 1992, there were major changes in Swedish law of the deceased, which had led to a dramatic decrease in autopsy rates. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of fatal or potential fatal surgical diseases within a Swedish forensic autopsy cohort, before and after this change in legislation. Methods: Deaths referred for forensic autopsy at the Institution of Forensic Medicine, Lund University Hospital, Sweden, between 1970-1982 and 2000-2004, were studied regarding the prevalence of aorto-iliac diseases, acute abdomen and abdominal cancer. Results: The forensic autopsy rates in the population during the two time periods were 14.0% (29 399 patients) and 5.3% (4487 patients), respectively. The total prevalence of surgical diseases has increased significantly from 67.3 (95% confidence interval 64.3-70.2) to 83.4 (74.9-91.8) per 1000 autopsies, respectively. The cause-specific mortality ratios in patients with fatal acute abdomen increased significantly from 16.5 (15.1-18.0) to 39.0 (33.2-44.8) per 1000 autopsies, respectively, and there was almost a three-time increase in patients with fatal gastrointestinal haemorrhage and acute alcohol-related pancreatitis. Conclusions: Forensic autopsy data continues to be invaluable, despite changes in legislation in Sweden, for epidemiological studies on fatal or potential fatal surgical diseases. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
fatal surgical disease, forensic autopsy
in
ANZ Journal of Surgery
volume
77
issue
9
pages
718 - 721
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000248599800006
  • scopus:34447125226
ISSN
1445-2197
DOI
10.1111/j.1445-2197.2007.04213.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
cd8c8dc6-0e3c-46df-b1d5-d8e01ebd1f0a (old id 692927)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=17685944&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-12-11 09:26:43
date last changed
2017-05-21 04:19:29
@article{cd8c8dc6-0e3c-46df-b1d5-d8e01ebd1f0a,
  abstract     = {Background: In 1992, there were major changes in Swedish law of the deceased, which had led to a dramatic decrease in autopsy rates. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of fatal or potential fatal surgical diseases within a Swedish forensic autopsy cohort, before and after this change in legislation. Methods: Deaths referred for forensic autopsy at the Institution of Forensic Medicine, Lund University Hospital, Sweden, between 1970-1982 and 2000-2004, were studied regarding the prevalence of aorto-iliac diseases, acute abdomen and abdominal cancer. Results: The forensic autopsy rates in the population during the two time periods were 14.0% (29 399 patients) and 5.3% (4487 patients), respectively. The total prevalence of surgical diseases has increased significantly from 67.3 (95% confidence interval 64.3-70.2) to 83.4 (74.9-91.8) per 1000 autopsies, respectively. The cause-specific mortality ratios in patients with fatal acute abdomen increased significantly from 16.5 (15.1-18.0) to 39.0 (33.2-44.8) per 1000 autopsies, respectively, and there was almost a three-time increase in patients with fatal gastrointestinal haemorrhage and acute alcohol-related pancreatitis. Conclusions: Forensic autopsy data continues to be invaluable, despite changes in legislation in Sweden, for epidemiological studies on fatal or potential fatal surgical diseases.},
  author       = {Acosta, Stefan and Krantz, Peter},
  issn         = {1445-2197},
  keyword      = {fatal surgical disease,forensic autopsy},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {718--721},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {ANZ Journal of Surgery},
  title        = {Trends in prevalence of fatal surgical diseases at forensic autopsy},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1445-2197.2007.04213.x},
  volume       = {77},
  year         = {2007},
}