Advanced

Rheumatoid arthritis: what does it cost and what factors are driving those costs? Results of a survey in a community-derived population in Malmo, Sweden

Jacobsson, Lennart LU ; Lindroth, Y.; Marsal, L.; Juran, E.; Bergström, Ulf LU and Kobelt, G. (2007) In Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology 36(3). p.179-183
Abstract
Objective: We sought to investigate the cost of living with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and evaluate the influence of both demographics and specific disease characteristics on these costs. Methods: We used a population-based questionnaire to survey 895 patients living in the city of Malmo, Sweden, during 2002. Data were obtained on direct resource consumption, investments, informal care and work capacity, as well as utility, function and patients' assessment of disease severity and pain. Results: The survey was completed by 613 patients (68%). Their mean age was 66 years, 74% were female and the mean duration of disease was 16.7 years. The total mean annual cost per patient was 108 370 SEK (12 020 EUR). Direct costs represented 41% of that... (More)
Objective: We sought to investigate the cost of living with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and evaluate the influence of both demographics and specific disease characteristics on these costs. Methods: We used a population-based questionnaire to survey 895 patients living in the city of Malmo, Sweden, during 2002. Data were obtained on direct resource consumption, investments, informal care and work capacity, as well as utility, function and patients' assessment of disease severity and pain. Results: The survey was completed by 613 patients (68%). Their mean age was 66 years, 74% were female and the mean duration of disease was 16.7 years. The total mean annual cost per patient was 108 370 SEK (12 020 EUR). Direct costs represented 41% of that amount and were predominantly for drugs [141% of the participants were receiving treatment with tumour necrosis factor (TNF) blockers], community services and hospitalisation. Function measured with the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) was the main statistical predictor for all types of costs except sick leave, which was most strongly associated with patients' perception of global health. Conclusion: This is the first study in Sweden to include all costs incurred by a group representative of RA in the community. In comparison with previous studies, total costs had increased by more than 40%. Furthermore, direct costs were higher and constituted a great proportion of total costs because of more intensive treatments (i.e. the use of TNF blockers). Future comparisons will enable health economic evaluations on a community level. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology
volume
36
issue
3
pages
179 - 183
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000247525500004
  • scopus:34547418177
ISSN
1502-7732
DOI
10.1080/03009740601089580
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2b654f52-36c8-4e82-8e7d-4ca51db652b3 (old id 693092)
date added to LUP
2007-12-11 13:35:09
date last changed
2017-09-10 03:50:55
@article{2b654f52-36c8-4e82-8e7d-4ca51db652b3,
  abstract     = {Objective: We sought to investigate the cost of living with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and evaluate the influence of both demographics and specific disease characteristics on these costs. Methods: We used a population-based questionnaire to survey 895 patients living in the city of Malmo, Sweden, during 2002. Data were obtained on direct resource consumption, investments, informal care and work capacity, as well as utility, function and patients' assessment of disease severity and pain. Results: The survey was completed by 613 patients (68%). Their mean age was 66 years, 74% were female and the mean duration of disease was 16.7 years. The total mean annual cost per patient was 108 370 SEK (12 020 EUR). Direct costs represented 41% of that amount and were predominantly for drugs [141% of the participants were receiving treatment with tumour necrosis factor (TNF) blockers], community services and hospitalisation. Function measured with the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) was the main statistical predictor for all types of costs except sick leave, which was most strongly associated with patients' perception of global health. Conclusion: This is the first study in Sweden to include all costs incurred by a group representative of RA in the community. In comparison with previous studies, total costs had increased by more than 40%. Furthermore, direct costs were higher and constituted a great proportion of total costs because of more intensive treatments (i.e. the use of TNF blockers). Future comparisons will enable health economic evaluations on a community level.},
  author       = {Jacobsson, Lennart and Lindroth, Y. and Marsal, L. and Juran, E. and Bergström, Ulf and Kobelt, G.},
  issn         = {1502-7732},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {179--183},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology},
  title        = {Rheumatoid arthritis: what does it cost and what factors are driving those costs? Results of a survey in a community-derived population in Malmo, Sweden},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03009740601089580},
  volume       = {36},
  year         = {2007},
}