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Inequality trends in maternal health services for young Ghanaian women with childbirth history between 2003 and 2014

Asamoah, Benedict Oppong LU and Agardh, Anette LU (2017) In BMJ Open 7(2).
Abstract

Objective: To achieve universal coverage of reproductive healthcare and drastic reduction in maternal mortality, adequate attention and resources should be given to young women. This study therefore aimed to examine the inequality trends in the use of antenatal care (ANC) services and skilled birth attendance (SBA) within a subgroup of Ghanaian women aged 15-24 years between 2003 and 2014. Design: This is a cross-sectional study that used data from the Ghana Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) 2003, 2008 and 2014. We applied regression-based total attributable fraction (TAF) as an index for measuring multiple dimensions of inequality in the use of ANC and SBA. Setting: Ghana. Participants: Young women aged 15-24 years with at least one... (More)

Objective: To achieve universal coverage of reproductive healthcare and drastic reduction in maternal mortality, adequate attention and resources should be given to young women. This study therefore aimed to examine the inequality trends in the use of antenatal care (ANC) services and skilled birth attendance (SBA) within a subgroup of Ghanaian women aged 15-24 years between 2003 and 2014. Design: This is a cross-sectional study that used data from the Ghana Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) 2003, 2008 and 2014. We applied regression-based total attributable fraction (TAF) as an index for measuring multiple dimensions of inequality in the use of ANC and SBA. Setting: Ghana. Participants: Young women aged 15-24 years with at least one previous birth experience in the past 5 years prior to the surveys. Main outcome measures: ANC visits and skilled attendance at birth. Results: Urbanicity-related, education-related and wealth-related inequality in non-use of SBA declined between 2003 and 2008, but increased between 2008 and 2014. A consistent decline was observed in urbanicity-related inequality in non-use of four or more ANC visits from 2003 through 2008 to 2014. A similar reduction was observed for education-related inequality in relation to the same outcome. In contrast, wealth-related inequality in ANC usage increased over time. Conclusions: The rise in urbanicity-related, education-related and wealth-related inequality in the usage of SBA between 2008 and 2014 threatens the sustainability of the general progress made in the usage of maternal health services in Ghana within the same period.

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author
organization
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type
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publication status
published
subject
in
BMJ Open
volume
7
issue
2
publisher
British Medical Journal Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • scopus:85011954116
  • wos:000397872400009
ISSN
2044-6055
DOI
10.1136/bmjopen-2016-011663
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
6958438d-3481-4a98-a1d4-f90f93ef2071
date added to LUP
2017-02-27 14:48:47
date last changed
2018-01-07 11:52:59
@article{6958438d-3481-4a98-a1d4-f90f93ef2071,
  abstract     = {<p>Objective: To achieve universal coverage of reproductive healthcare and drastic reduction in maternal mortality, adequate attention and resources should be given to young women. This study therefore aimed to examine the inequality trends in the use of antenatal care (ANC) services and skilled birth attendance (SBA) within a subgroup of Ghanaian women aged 15-24 years between 2003 and 2014. Design: This is a cross-sectional study that used data from the Ghana Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) 2003, 2008 and 2014. We applied regression-based total attributable fraction (TAF) as an index for measuring multiple dimensions of inequality in the use of ANC and SBA. Setting: Ghana. Participants: Young women aged 15-24 years with at least one previous birth experience in the past 5 years prior to the surveys. Main outcome measures: ANC visits and skilled attendance at birth. Results: Urbanicity-related, education-related and wealth-related inequality in non-use of SBA declined between 2003 and 2008, but increased between 2008 and 2014. A consistent decline was observed in urbanicity-related inequality in non-use of four or more ANC visits from 2003 through 2008 to 2014. A similar reduction was observed for education-related inequality in relation to the same outcome. In contrast, wealth-related inequality in ANC usage increased over time. Conclusions: The rise in urbanicity-related, education-related and wealth-related inequality in the usage of SBA between 2008 and 2014 threatens the sustainability of the general progress made in the usage of maternal health services in Ghana within the same period.</p>},
  articleno    = {e011663},
  author       = {Asamoah, Benedict Oppong and Agardh, Anette},
  issn         = {2044-6055},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {02},
  number       = {2},
  publisher    = {British Medical Journal Publishing Group},
  series       = {BMJ Open},
  title        = {Inequality trends in maternal health services for young Ghanaian women with childbirth history between 2003 and 2014},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2016-011663},
  volume       = {7},
  year         = {2017},
}