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Olfaction in raptors

Potier, Simon LU (2020) In Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society 189(3). p.713-721
Abstract

Raptors from the orders Accipitriformes and Falconiformes have been considered to rely principally on vision. Historically, this assumption has led scientists to discount any possible sense of smell in these birds, until work on cathartid vultures indicated that these species at least rely on olfaction to find carrion. In this review I provide evidence that raptors in general have functional olfactory systems that they may use in a range of different contexts. Anatomical studies show that raptors have well-developed olfactory bulbs that are within the range of other bird species. Furthermore, all raptors studied have multiple functional olfactory genes, with, for instance, 283 olfactory genes in the Oriental honey buzzard, Pernis... (More)

Raptors from the orders Accipitriformes and Falconiformes have been considered to rely principally on vision. Historically, this assumption has led scientists to discount any possible sense of smell in these birds, until work on cathartid vultures indicated that these species at least rely on olfaction to find carrion. In this review I provide evidence that raptors in general have functional olfactory systems that they may use in a range of different contexts. Anatomical studies show that raptors have well-developed olfactory bulbs that are within the range of other bird species. Furthermore, all raptors studied have multiple functional olfactory genes, with, for instance, 283 olfactory genes in the Oriental honey buzzard, Pernis orientalis, of which 81.5% are functional. It has also been shown that some raptors species may functionally use olfactory cues to forage and, potentially, for communication. While further research is required, the available evidence suggests that olfaction may be a more important sensory modality in these birds than previously thought.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Accipitriformes, Chemosignalling, Communication, Falconiformes, Foraging, Olfactory Bulb, Sensory Ecology, Smell
in
Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society
volume
189
issue
3
pages
9 pages
publisher
Oxford University Press
external identifiers
  • scopus:85078175525
ISSN
0024-4082
DOI
10.1093/zoolinnean/zlz121
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
6a3be018-2ddd-4aa4-8fb4-c7d0c9f5075f
date added to LUP
2020-12-29 14:44:28
date last changed
2020-12-30 01:42:04
@article{6a3be018-2ddd-4aa4-8fb4-c7d0c9f5075f,
  abstract     = {<p>Raptors from the orders Accipitriformes and Falconiformes have been considered to rely principally on vision. Historically, this assumption has led scientists to discount any possible sense of smell in these birds, until work on cathartid vultures indicated that these species at least rely on olfaction to find carrion. In this review I provide evidence that raptors in general have functional olfactory systems that they may use in a range of different contexts. Anatomical studies show that raptors have well-developed olfactory bulbs that are within the range of other bird species. Furthermore, all raptors studied have multiple functional olfactory genes, with, for instance, 283 olfactory genes in the Oriental honey buzzard, Pernis orientalis, of which 81.5% are functional. It has also been shown that some raptors species may functionally use olfactory cues to forage and, potentially, for communication. While further research is required, the available evidence suggests that olfaction may be a more important sensory modality in these birds than previously thought.</p>},
  author       = {Potier, Simon},
  issn         = {0024-4082},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {713--721},
  publisher    = {Oxford University Press},
  series       = {Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society},
  title        = {Olfaction in raptors},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/zoolinnean/zlz121},
  doi          = {10.1093/zoolinnean/zlz121},
  volume       = {189},
  year         = {2020},
}