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European task force on atopic dermatitis position paper : treatment of parental atopic dermatitis during preconception, pregnancy and lactation period

Vestergaard, C.; Wollenberg, A.; Barbarot, S.; Christen-Zaech, S.; Deleuran, M.; Spuls, P.; Flohr, C.; Trzeciak, M.; von Kobyletzki, L. LU and Seneschal, J., et al. (2019) In Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology
Abstract

Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common inflammatory skin disease that affects both children and adults, including a large number of adults of reproductive age. Several guidelines for the treatment of AD exist, yet specific recommendations for the treatment of pregnant or lactating women and for adults planning to have a child are often lacking. This position paper from the European Task force on Atopic Dermatitis (ETFAD) is based on up-to-date scientific literature on treating pregnant and lactating women as wells as adults with AD planning to have a child. It is based on the expert opinions of members of the ETFAD and on existing safety data on the proposed treatments, many of which are derived from patients with other inflammatory... (More)

Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common inflammatory skin disease that affects both children and adults, including a large number of adults of reproductive age. Several guidelines for the treatment of AD exist, yet specific recommendations for the treatment of pregnant or lactating women and for adults planning to have a child are often lacking. This position paper from the European Task force on Atopic Dermatitis (ETFAD) is based on up-to-date scientific literature on treating pregnant and lactating women as wells as adults with AD planning to have a child. It is based on the expert opinions of members of the ETFAD and on existing safety data on the proposed treatments, many of which are derived from patients with other inflammatory diseases or from transplantation medicine. For treating future parents, as well as pregnant and lactating women with AD, the use of topical treatments including moisturizers, topical corticosteroids, tacrolimus, antiseptics such as chlorhexidine, octenidine, potassium permanganate and sodium hypochlorite (bleach) is deemed to be safe. Ultraviolet (UV) therapy may also be used. Systemic treatment should be prescribed only after careful consideration. According to the opinion of the ETFAD, treatment should be restricted to systemic corticosteroids and cyclosporine A, and, in selected cases, azathioprine.

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Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:85068145858
ISSN
0926-9959
DOI
10.1111/jdv.15709
language
English
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yes
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6aa019be-3a1c-46b5-ada6-c38a23d4a2cc
date added to LUP
2019-07-11 12:18:39
date last changed
2019-08-06 03:24:15
@article{6aa019be-3a1c-46b5-ada6-c38a23d4a2cc,
  abstract     = {<p>Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common inflammatory skin disease that affects both children and adults, including a large number of adults of reproductive age. Several guidelines for the treatment of AD exist, yet specific recommendations for the treatment of pregnant or lactating women and for adults planning to have a child are often lacking. This position paper from the European Task force on Atopic Dermatitis (ETFAD) is based on up-to-date scientific literature on treating pregnant and lactating women as wells as adults with AD planning to have a child. It is based on the expert opinions of members of the ETFAD and on existing safety data on the proposed treatments, many of which are derived from patients with other inflammatory diseases or from transplantation medicine. For treating future parents, as well as pregnant and lactating women with AD, the use of topical treatments including moisturizers, topical corticosteroids, tacrolimus, antiseptics such as chlorhexidine, octenidine, potassium permanganate and sodium hypochlorite (bleach) is deemed to be safe. Ultraviolet (UV) therapy may also be used. Systemic treatment should be prescribed only after careful consideration. According to the opinion of the ETFAD, treatment should be restricted to systemic corticosteroids and cyclosporine A, and, in selected cases, azathioprine.</p>},
  author       = {Vestergaard, C. and Wollenberg, A. and Barbarot, S. and Christen-Zaech, S. and Deleuran, M. and Spuls, P. and Flohr, C. and Trzeciak, M. and von Kobyletzki, L. and Seneschal, J. and Paul, C. and Bieber, T. and Werfel, T. and Fölster-Holst, R. and Darsow, U. and Gieler, U. and Svensson,  and Cork, M. and Stalder, J. F. and De Raeve, L. and Kunz, B. and Simon, D. and Chernyshov, P. and Hijnen, D. and Gelmetti, C. and Ring, J. and Taieb, A. and de Bruin-Weller, M. and Thyssen, J. P.},
  issn         = {0926-9959},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {06},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology},
  title        = {European task force on atopic dermatitis position paper : treatment of parental atopic dermatitis during preconception, pregnancy and lactation period},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jdv.15709},
  year         = {2019},
}