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Contact system activation in severe infectious diseases.

Oehmcke, Sonja LU and Herwald, Heiko LU (2010) In Journal of Molecular Medicine 88(2). p.121-126
Abstract
Hemostasis is a sensitive and tightly regulated process, involving vascular endothelium and blood cells, as well as factors of the coagulation and fibrinolytic cascades. In severe and invasive infectious diseases, the equilibrium between the procoagulant and anticoagulant status of the host may change dramatically and can induce life-threatening complications. A growing body of evidence suggests that the contact system, also known as the intrinsic pathway of coagulation or kallikrein/kinin system, participate in these processes. Contact activation leads to the release of the highly potent proinflammatory peptide bradykinin and initiates the intrinsic pathway of coagulation. Several studies have shown a systemic activation of the contact... (More)
Hemostasis is a sensitive and tightly regulated process, involving vascular endothelium and blood cells, as well as factors of the coagulation and fibrinolytic cascades. In severe and invasive infectious diseases, the equilibrium between the procoagulant and anticoagulant status of the host may change dramatically and can induce life-threatening complications. A growing body of evidence suggests that the contact system, also known as the intrinsic pathway of coagulation or kallikrein/kinin system, participate in these processes. Contact activation leads to the release of the highly potent proinflammatory peptide bradykinin and initiates the intrinsic pathway of coagulation. Several studies have shown a systemic activation of the contact system in animal models of severe bacterial infections, and similar findings were also reported when monitoring patients suffering from sepsis, severe sepsis, or septic shock. Complications resulting from a systemic activation of the contact system are pathologically high levels of bradykinin, consumption of contact factors, and a subsequent induction of inflammatory reactions. These conditions may contribute to serious complications such as hypotension and vascular leakage. Here, we summarize the state of the art in this field of research with a focus on the contact system, and we also discuss a potential role for the contact system as a target for the development of novel antimicrobial strategies. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Molecular Medicine
volume
88
issue
2
pages
121 - 126
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000275415500006
  • pmid:20232512
  • scopus:77951205291
  • pmid:20232512
ISSN
1432-1440
DOI
10.1007/s00109-009-0564-y
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
6b3a47c9-6905-4b46-b657-98e8eebaf59d (old id 1582068)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20232512?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 09:53:17
date last changed
2020-02-19 01:03:26
@article{6b3a47c9-6905-4b46-b657-98e8eebaf59d,
  abstract     = {Hemostasis is a sensitive and tightly regulated process, involving vascular endothelium and blood cells, as well as factors of the coagulation and fibrinolytic cascades. In severe and invasive infectious diseases, the equilibrium between the procoagulant and anticoagulant status of the host may change dramatically and can induce life-threatening complications. A growing body of evidence suggests that the contact system, also known as the intrinsic pathway of coagulation or kallikrein/kinin system, participate in these processes. Contact activation leads to the release of the highly potent proinflammatory peptide bradykinin and initiates the intrinsic pathway of coagulation. Several studies have shown a systemic activation of the contact system in animal models of severe bacterial infections, and similar findings were also reported when monitoring patients suffering from sepsis, severe sepsis, or septic shock. Complications resulting from a systemic activation of the contact system are pathologically high levels of bradykinin, consumption of contact factors, and a subsequent induction of inflammatory reactions. These conditions may contribute to serious complications such as hypotension and vascular leakage. Here, we summarize the state of the art in this field of research with a focus on the contact system, and we also discuss a potential role for the contact system as a target for the development of novel antimicrobial strategies.},
  author       = {Oehmcke, Sonja and Herwald, Heiko},
  issn         = {1432-1440},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {121--126},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Journal of Molecular Medicine},
  title        = {Contact system activation in severe infectious diseases.},
  url          = {https://lup.lub.lu.se/search/ws/files/1359862/1636366.pdf},
  doi          = {10.1007/s00109-009-0564-y},
  volume       = {88},
  year         = {2010},
}