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Proneurotensin Predicts Cardiovascular Disease in an Elderly Population

Fawad, Ayesha LU ; Bergmann, Andreas; Struck, Joachim; Nilsson, Peter M. LU ; Orho-Melander, Marju LU and Melander, Olle LU (2018) In Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism 103(5). p.1940-1947
Abstract

Context: The gut hormone neurotensin promotes fat absorption, diet-induced weight gain, and liver steatosis. Its stable precursor-hormone fragment "proneurotensin" predicts cardiometabolic disease in middle-aged populations, especially in women. Objective: To test if proneurotensin predicts cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes development in an elderly population and whether there are gender differences in this respect. Design, Setting, and Participants: Fasting proneurotensin was measured in plasma from 4804 participants (mean age 69±6 years) of the Malmö Preventive Project and subjects were followed up for development of CVD and diabetes during 5.4 years. Main Outcome Measures: Multivariate adjusted Cox proportional hazard models... (More)

Context: The gut hormone neurotensin promotes fat absorption, diet-induced weight gain, and liver steatosis. Its stable precursor-hormone fragment "proneurotensin" predicts cardiometabolic disease in middle-aged populations, especially in women. Objective: To test if proneurotensin predicts cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes development in an elderly population and whether there are gender differences in this respect. Design, Setting, and Participants: Fasting proneurotensin was measured in plasma from 4804 participants (mean age 69±6 years) of the Malmö Preventive Project and subjects were followed up for development of CVD and diabetes during 5.4 years. Main Outcome Measures: Multivariate adjusted Cox proportional hazard models CVD were used to relate the proneurotensin to the risk of incident CVD and diabetes in all subjects and in genderstratified analyses. Results: In total, there were 456 first CVD events and 222 incident cases of diabetes. The hazard ratio [HR (95% confidence interval)] for CVD per 1 standard deviation (SD) increment of proneurotensin was 1.10 (1.01 to 1.21); P = 0.037, and the above vs below median HR was 1.27 (1.06 to 1.54); P = 0.011, with similar effect sizes in both genders. There was no significant association between proneurotensin and incident diabetes in the entire population (P = 0.52) or among men (P = 0.52). However, in women proneurotensin predicted diabetes incidence with a per 1 SD increment HR of 1.28 (1.30 to 1.59); P = 0.025 and an above vs below median HR of 1.41 (1.10 to 1.80); P = 0.007. Conclusions: In the elderly population, proneurotensin independently predicts development of CVD in both genders, whereas it only predicts diabetes in women.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
volume
103
issue
5
pages
8 pages
publisher
The Endocrine Society
external identifiers
  • scopus:85047220563
ISSN
0021-972X
DOI
10.1210/jc.2017-02424
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
6c70a757-8322-43d4-9769-af23ee333321
date added to LUP
2018-06-01 14:12:58
date last changed
2019-10-15 06:39:28
@article{6c70a757-8322-43d4-9769-af23ee333321,
  abstract     = {<p>Context: The gut hormone neurotensin promotes fat absorption, diet-induced weight gain, and liver steatosis. Its stable precursor-hormone fragment "proneurotensin" predicts cardiometabolic disease in middle-aged populations, especially in women. Objective: To test if proneurotensin predicts cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes development in an elderly population and whether there are gender differences in this respect. Design, Setting, and Participants: Fasting proneurotensin was measured in plasma from 4804 participants (mean age 69±6 years) of the Malmö Preventive Project and subjects were followed up for development of CVD and diabetes during 5.4 years. Main Outcome Measures: Multivariate adjusted Cox proportional hazard models CVD were used to relate the proneurotensin to the risk of incident CVD and diabetes in all subjects and in genderstratified analyses. Results: In total, there were 456 first CVD events and 222 incident cases of diabetes. The hazard ratio [HR (95% confidence interval)] for CVD per 1 standard deviation (SD) increment of proneurotensin was 1.10 (1.01 to 1.21); P = 0.037, and the above vs below median HR was 1.27 (1.06 to 1.54); P = 0.011, with similar effect sizes in both genders. There was no significant association between proneurotensin and incident diabetes in the entire population (P = 0.52) or among men (P = 0.52). However, in women proneurotensin predicted diabetes incidence with a per 1 SD increment HR of 1.28 (1.30 to 1.59); P = 0.025 and an above vs below median HR of 1.41 (1.10 to 1.80); P = 0.007. Conclusions: In the elderly population, proneurotensin independently predicts development of CVD in both genders, whereas it only predicts diabetes in women.</p>},
  author       = {Fawad, Ayesha and Bergmann, Andreas and Struck, Joachim and Nilsson, Peter M. and Orho-Melander, Marju and Melander, Olle},
  issn         = {0021-972X},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {05},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {1940--1947},
  publisher    = {The Endocrine Society},
  series       = {Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism},
  title        = {Proneurotensin Predicts Cardiovascular Disease in an Elderly Population},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1210/jc.2017-02424},
  volume       = {103},
  year         = {2018},
}