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Erdgaswirtschaft. Treibhausgas-emissionen fossiler energieträger

Lechtenböhmer, Stefan LU ; Dienst, Carmen; Fischedick, Manfred and Hanke, Thomas (2005) In BWK - Energie-Fachmagazin 57(5). p.62-66
Abstract (Swedish)
A discussion covers a study made of greenhouse gas emissions in the transport of Russian natural gas to Germany and a comparing them with corresponding emissions from other fossil primary energy carriers. With the coming into force of the Kyoto protocol on 2/16/2005 climate protection strategies relying on a greater use of natural gas as a replacement for petroleum and brown and hard coal become more significant. The evaluation of greenhouse gas emissions from primary energy carriers must consider the sequence from provisioning to transport to combustion. The broad topics are introduction; new independent measurements in Russia; comparative evaluation of the individual energy carriers; and summing up. To improve the knowledge of emissions... (More)
A discussion covers a study made of greenhouse gas emissions in the transport of Russian natural gas to Germany and a comparing them with corresponding emissions from other fossil primary energy carriers. With the coming into force of the Kyoto protocol on 2/16/2005 climate protection strategies relying on a greater use of natural gas as a replacement for petroleum and brown and hard coal become more significant. The evaluation of greenhouse gas emissions from primary energy carriers must consider the sequence from provisioning to transport to combustion. The broad topics are introduction; new independent measurements in Russia; comparative evaluation of the individual energy carriers; and summing up. To improve the knowledge of emissions from the Russian gas export system, the Wuppertal Institute for Climate, Environment, and Energy together with the Max-Planck Institute for Chemistry conceived and made new measurements in Russia. The comprehensive measurements, made on order from the E.on Ruhrgas AG, comprised three measurement trips to Central and North Russia and Western Siberia. The emissions measurements were made at five compressor stations in the central and northern export corridor. Individually, 50 compressors, 25 valve connections, and 2380 km of pipeline sections were scrutinized. The facilities studied were in different regions in Russia and covered the most significant climate zones, and age and size classes, so that they represented the export corridor. Gazprom/VNIIGaz for the first time provided detailed data on the stock of engines and facility parks of the export corridor, on engine running times, emissions characteristics, repairs and maintenance, and accidents. The results showed that greenhouse gas emissions from natural gas imported from Russia are clearly less than those of crude oil. There are still greater advantages with respect to hard and soft coal. In many uses natural gas can be convened at a higher efficiency than hard and soft coal and crude oil giving natural gas an added lead over other primary fossil energy carriers. The study was made from 2002 to 2004. It is expected that greenhouse gas emissions from the Russian natural gas transport system will be further reduced in the future. (Less)
Abstract

A discussion covers a study made of greenhouse gas emissions in the transport of Russian natural gas to Germany and a comparing them with corresponding emissions from other fossil primary energy carriers. With the coming into force of the Kyoto protocol on 2/16/2005 climate protection strategies relying on a greater use of natural gas as a replacement for petroleum and brown and hard coal become more significant. The evaluation of greenhouse gas emissions from primary energy carriers must consider the sequence from provisioning to transport to combustion. The broad topics are introduction; new independent measurements in Russia; comparative evaluation of the individual energy carriers; and summing up. To improve the knowledge of... (More)

A discussion covers a study made of greenhouse gas emissions in the transport of Russian natural gas to Germany and a comparing them with corresponding emissions from other fossil primary energy carriers. With the coming into force of the Kyoto protocol on 2/16/2005 climate protection strategies relying on a greater use of natural gas as a replacement for petroleum and brown and hard coal become more significant. The evaluation of greenhouse gas emissions from primary energy carriers must consider the sequence from provisioning to transport to combustion. The broad topics are introduction; new independent measurements in Russia; comparative evaluation of the individual energy carriers; and summing up. To improve the knowledge of emissions from the Russian gas export system, the Wuppertal Institute for Climate, Environment, and Energy together with the Max-Planck Institute for Chemistry conceived and made new measurements in Russia. The comprehensive measurements, made on order from the E.on Ruhrgas AG, comprised three measurement trips to Central and North Russia and Western Siberia. The emissions measurements were made at five compressor stations in the central and northern export corridor. Individually, 50 compressors, 25 valve connections, and 2380 km of pipeline sections were scrutinized. The facilities studied were in different regions in Russia and covered the most significant climate zones, and age and size classes, so that they represented the export corridor. Gazprom/VNIIGaz for the first time provided detailed data on the stock of engines and facility parks of the export corridor, on engine running times, emissions characteristics, repairs and maintenance, and accidents. The results showed that greenhouse gas emissions from natural gas imported from Russia are clearly less than those of crude oil. There are still greater advantages with respect to hard and soft coal. In many uses natural gas can be convened at a higher efficiency than hard and soft coal and crude oil giving natural gas an added lead over other primary fossil energy carriers. The study was made from 2002 to 2004. It is expected that greenhouse gas emissions from the Russian natural gas transport system will be further reduced in the future.

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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
alternative title
Natural gas industry. Greenhouse gas emissions of fossil energy carriers
publishing date
type
Contribution to specialist publication or newspaper
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Pipelines, natural gas, Greenhouse gases
in
BWK - Energie-Fachmagazin
volume
57
issue
5
pages
5 pages
publisher
Springer-VDI Verlag GmbH und Co. KG
external identifiers
  • scopus:24944498222
ISSN
1618-193X
language
German
LU publication?
no
id
6de8e0f7-6dca-4fc9-88d1-1925d7e3540c
date added to LUP
2018-10-07 10:13:01
date last changed
2019-02-20 11:29:42
@misc{6de8e0f7-6dca-4fc9-88d1-1925d7e3540c,
  abstract     = {<p>A discussion covers a study made of greenhouse gas emissions in the transport of Russian natural gas to Germany and a comparing them with corresponding emissions from other fossil primary energy carriers. With the coming into force of the Kyoto protocol on 2/16/2005 climate protection strategies relying on a greater use of natural gas as a replacement for petroleum and brown and hard coal become more significant. The evaluation of greenhouse gas emissions from primary energy carriers must consider the sequence from provisioning to transport to combustion. The broad topics are introduction; new independent measurements in Russia; comparative evaluation of the individual energy carriers; and summing up. To improve the knowledge of emissions from the Russian gas export system, the Wuppertal Institute for Climate, Environment, and Energy together with the Max-Planck Institute for Chemistry conceived and made new measurements in Russia. The comprehensive measurements, made on order from the E.on Ruhrgas AG, comprised three measurement trips to Central and North Russia and Western Siberia. The emissions measurements were made at five compressor stations in the central and northern export corridor. Individually, 50 compressors, 25 valve connections, and 2380 km of pipeline sections were scrutinized. The facilities studied were in different regions in Russia and covered the most significant climate zones, and age and size classes, so that they represented the export corridor. Gazprom/VNIIGaz for the first time provided detailed data on the stock of engines and facility parks of the export corridor, on engine running times, emissions characteristics, repairs and maintenance, and accidents. The results showed that greenhouse gas emissions from natural gas imported from Russia are clearly less than those of crude oil. There are still greater advantages with respect to hard and soft coal. In many uses natural gas can be convened at a higher efficiency than hard and soft coal and crude oil giving natural gas an added lead over other primary fossil energy carriers. The study was made from 2002 to 2004. It is expected that greenhouse gas emissions from the Russian natural gas transport system will be further reduced in the future.</p>},
  author       = {Lechtenböhmer, Stefan and Dienst, Carmen and Fischedick, Manfred and Hanke, Thomas},
  issn         = {1618-193X},
  keyword      = {Pipelines,natural gas,Greenhouse gases},
  language     = {ger},
  month        = {09},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {62--66},
  publisher    = {Springer-VDI Verlag GmbH und Co. KG},
  series       = {BWK - Energie-Fachmagazin},
  title        = {Erdgaswirtschaft. Treibhausgas-emissionen fossiler energieträger},
  volume       = {57},
  year         = {2005},
}