Advanced

Eye dosimetry and protective eyewear for interventional clinicians

Martin, C J ; Magee, J S ; Sandblom, V ; Almén, A LU and Lundh, C (2015) In Radiation Protection Dosimetry 165(1-4). p.284-288
Abstract

Doses to the eyes of interventional clinicians can exceed 20 mSv. Various protective devices can afford protection to the eyes with the final barrier being protective eyewear. The protection provided by lead glasses is difficult to quantify, and the majority of dosimeters are not designed to be worn under lead glasses. This study has measured dose reduction factors (DRFs) equal to the ratio of the dose with no protection, divided by that when lead glasses are worn. Glasses have been tested in X-ray fields using anthropomorphic phantoms to simulate the patient and clinician. DRFs for X-rays incident from the front vary from 5.2 to 7.6, while values for orientations reminiscent of clinical practice are between 1.4 and 5.2. Results suggest... (More)

Doses to the eyes of interventional clinicians can exceed 20 mSv. Various protective devices can afford protection to the eyes with the final barrier being protective eyewear. The protection provided by lead glasses is difficult to quantify, and the majority of dosimeters are not designed to be worn under lead glasses. This study has measured dose reduction factors (DRFs) equal to the ratio of the dose with no protection, divided by that when lead glasses are worn. Glasses have been tested in X-ray fields using anthropomorphic phantoms to simulate the patient and clinician. DRFs for X-rays incident from the front vary from 5.2 to 7.6, while values for orientations reminiscent of clinical practice are between 1.4 and 5.2. Results suggest that a DRF of two is a conservative factor that could be applied to personal dosimeter measurements to account for the dose reduction provided by most types of lead glasses.

(Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
; ; ; and
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Anthropometry, Eye Protective Devices, Humans, Lead, Lens, Crystalline/radiation effects, Medical Staff, Occupational Exposure/prevention & control, Occupational Injuries/prevention & control, Phantoms, Imaging, Protective Devices, Quality Assurance, Health Care, Radiation Dosage, Radiation Exposure/prevention & control, Radiation Injuries/prevention & control, Radiation Protection/methods, Radiology, Interventional/methods, Radiometry/methods, X-Rays
in
Radiation Protection Dosimetry
volume
165
issue
1-4
pages
5 pages
publisher
Oxford University Press
external identifiers
  • pmid:25848118
  • scopus:84939551596
ISSN
1742-3406
DOI
10.1093/rpd/ncv050
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
6e1cefce-8862-453b-acc6-96e32b4b537f
date added to LUP
2018-06-16 21:15:55
date last changed
2021-02-17 01:37:28
@article{6e1cefce-8862-453b-acc6-96e32b4b537f,
  abstract     = {<p>Doses to the eyes of interventional clinicians can exceed 20 mSv. Various protective devices can afford protection to the eyes with the final barrier being protective eyewear. The protection provided by lead glasses is difficult to quantify, and the majority of dosimeters are not designed to be worn under lead glasses. This study has measured dose reduction factors (DRFs) equal to the ratio of the dose with no protection, divided by that when lead glasses are worn. Glasses have been tested in X-ray fields using anthropomorphic phantoms to simulate the patient and clinician. DRFs for X-rays incident from the front vary from 5.2 to 7.6, while values for orientations reminiscent of clinical practice are between 1.4 and 5.2. Results suggest that a DRF of two is a conservative factor that could be applied to personal dosimeter measurements to account for the dose reduction provided by most types of lead glasses. </p>},
  author       = {Martin, C J and Magee, J S and Sandblom, V and Almén, A and Lundh, C},
  issn         = {1742-3406},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1-4},
  pages        = {284--288},
  publisher    = {Oxford University Press},
  series       = {Radiation Protection Dosimetry},
  title        = {Eye dosimetry and protective eyewear for interventional clinicians},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/rpd/ncv050},
  doi          = {10.1093/rpd/ncv050},
  volume       = {165},
  year         = {2015},
}