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Role of homologous recombination in trabectedin-induced DNA damage

Tavecchio, M LU ; de Simone, M; Erba, Eugenio; Chiolo, I; Liberi, G; Foiani, M; D'Incalci, Maurizio and Damia, Giovanna (2008) In European Journal of Cancer 44(4). p.18-609
Abstract

Trabectedin (ET-743, Yondelis) is a natural marine compound with antitumour activity currently undergoing phase II/III clinical trials. The mechanism of the drug's action is still to be defined, even though it has been clearly demonstrated the key role of Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER). To get further insights into the drug's mode of action, we studied the involvement of the DNA-double strand break repair (DNA-DSB) pathways: homologous and non-homologous recombination, both in budding yeasts and in mammalian cells and the possible cross-talk between NER and these repair pathways. Budding yeasts and mammalian cells deficient in the non-homologous end-joining pathway were moderately sensitive to trabectedin, while systems deficient in... (More)

Trabectedin (ET-743, Yondelis) is a natural marine compound with antitumour activity currently undergoing phase II/III clinical trials. The mechanism of the drug's action is still to be defined, even though it has been clearly demonstrated the key role of Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER). To get further insights into the drug's mode of action, we studied the involvement of the DNA-double strand break repair (DNA-DSB) pathways: homologous and non-homologous recombination, both in budding yeasts and in mammalian cells and the possible cross-talk between NER and these repair pathways. Budding yeasts and mammalian cells deficient in the non-homologous end-joining pathway were moderately sensitive to trabectedin, while systems deficient in the homologous recombination pathway were extremely sensitive to the drug, with a 100-fold decrease in the IC50, suggesting that trabectedin-induced lesions are repaired by this pathway. The induction of Rad51 foci and the appearance of gamma-H2AX were chosen as putative markers for DNA-DSBs and were studied at different time points after trabectedin treatment in NER proficient and deficient systems. Both were clearly detected only in the presence of an active NER, suggesting that the DSBs are not directly caused by the drug, but are formed during the processing/repair of the drug- induced lesions.

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published
keywords
Animals, Antineoplastic Agents, Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating, Biomarkers, CHO Cells, Carrier Proteins, Cisplatin, Cricetinae, Cricetulus, DNA Breaks, Double-Stranded, DNA Repair, Dioxoles, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Fibroblasts, Flow Cytometry, Histones, Humans, Immunohistochemistry, Methyl Methanesulfonate, Mutation, Phosphorylation, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Tetrahydroisoquinolines, Journal Article, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
in
European Journal of Cancer
volume
44
issue
4
pages
10 pages
publisher
IFAC & Elsevier Ltd.
external identifiers
  • scopus:40249097419
ISSN
0959-8049
DOI
10.1016/j.ejca.2008.01.003
language
English
LU publication?
no
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6f6a7bf7-d34d-4671-bc1d-1a678b712f2b
date added to LUP
2017-03-07 09:14:17
date last changed
2017-10-29 04:59:08
@article{6f6a7bf7-d34d-4671-bc1d-1a678b712f2b,
  abstract     = {<p>Trabectedin (ET-743, Yondelis) is a natural marine compound with antitumour activity currently undergoing phase II/III clinical trials. The mechanism of the drug's action is still to be defined, even though it has been clearly demonstrated the key role of Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER). To get further insights into the drug's mode of action, we studied the involvement of the DNA-double strand break repair (DNA-DSB) pathways: homologous and non-homologous recombination, both in budding yeasts and in mammalian cells and the possible cross-talk between NER and these repair pathways. Budding yeasts and mammalian cells deficient in the non-homologous end-joining pathway were moderately sensitive to trabectedin, while systems deficient in the homologous recombination pathway were extremely sensitive to the drug, with a 100-fold decrease in the IC50, suggesting that trabectedin-induced lesions are repaired by this pathway. The induction of Rad51 foci and the appearance of gamma-H2AX were chosen as putative markers for DNA-DSBs and were studied at different time points after trabectedin treatment in NER proficient and deficient systems. Both were clearly detected only in the presence of an active NER, suggesting that the DSBs are not directly caused by the drug, but are formed during the processing/repair of the drug- induced lesions.</p>},
  author       = {Tavecchio, M and de Simone, M and Erba, Eugenio and Chiolo, I and Liberi, G and Foiani, M and D'Incalci, Maurizio and Damia, Giovanna},
  issn         = {0959-8049},
  keyword      = {Animals,Antineoplastic Agents,Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating,Biomarkers,CHO Cells,Carrier Proteins,Cisplatin,Cricetinae,Cricetulus,DNA Breaks, Double-Stranded,DNA Repair,Dioxoles,Dose-Response Relationship, Drug,Fibroblasts,Flow Cytometry,Histones,Humans,Immunohistochemistry,Methyl Methanesulfonate,Mutation,Phosphorylation,Saccharomyces cerevisiae,Tetrahydroisoquinolines,Journal Article,Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {18--609},
  publisher    = {IFAC & Elsevier Ltd.},
  series       = {European Journal of Cancer},
  title        = {Role of homologous recombination in trabectedin-induced DNA damage},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejca.2008.01.003},
  volume       = {44},
  year         = {2008},
}