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Interior design elements influence on users’ wayfinding capacity in a Swedish hospital setting

Ibrahim, Muna LU (2017)
3RD INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE
ON ARCHITECTURE, RESEARCH, CARE AND HEALTH
p.91-104
Abstract

Wayfinding has been recognized as an important aspect that should be carefully considered, especially in the design of healthcare facilities. Previous studies have identified environmental elements that influence wayfinding, but there is still a lack of understanding on which properties of environmental elements and features that has the potential to aid wayfinding in hospital areas (Pati, Harvey, Willis & Pati, 2015). This pilot study examined the potential of interior design elements (including artwork) to support the participants’ ability to navigate in one of the reception halls at SUS Malmö hospital. In order to focus on the wordless wayfinding... (More)

Wayfinding has been recognized as an important aspect that should be carefully considered, especially in the design of healthcare facilities. Previous studies have identified environmental elements that influence wayfinding, but there is still a lack of understanding on which properties of environmental elements and features that has the potential to aid wayfinding in hospital areas (Pati, Harvey, Willis & Pati, 2015). This pilot study examined the potential of interior design elements (including artwork) to support the participants’ ability to navigate in one of the reception halls at SUS Malmö hospital. In order to focus on the wordless wayfinding capacity, two subject categories were participating, 1) Arabic speaking visitors; 2) and Swedish speaking visitors. The participants, 4 females and 7 males, responded to a questionnaire in dialogue with the researcher. The data analysis showed that artworks, plants, skylight, furniture, wooden material on walls, and a tilted reception cube were the most eye-catching physical elements associated with wayfinding. Written signs were seen as helpful but sometimes useless due to the fact that they are written only in the Swedish language, whereas artworks was the common language between most of the participants and therefore interesting to further explore. Since the majority of the participants disliked the artworks in the reception hall, the influence of aesthetic preferences on wayfinding could possibly be a fruitful path of further investigation

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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
wayfinding, hospitals, interior design, aesthetic preference, artwork
host publication
ARCH17 3RD INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ARCHITECTURE, RESEARCH, CARE AND HEALTH CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS
pages
14 pages
publisher
Polyteknisk Forlag
conference name
<br/>3RD INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE<br/>ON ARCHITECTURE, RESEARCH, CARE AND HEALTH
conference location
Copenhagen, Denmark
conference dates
2017-04-26 - 2017-04-27
ISBN
978-87-93585-00-3
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
6ffa9219-573a-4f2c-ad20-13d9d8df1cbf
date added to LUP
2019-03-06 16:14:45
date last changed
2019-04-04 09:30:42
@inproceedings{6ffa9219-573a-4f2c-ad20-13d9d8df1cbf,
  abstract     = {<p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align:justify;text-justify:inter-ideograph"><i>Wayfinding has been recognized as an important aspect that should be carefully considered, especially in the design of healthcare facilities. Previous studies have identified environmental elements that influence wayfinding, but there is still a lack of understanding on which properties of environmental elements and features that has the potential to aid wayfinding in hospital areas (Pati, Harvey, Willis &amp; Pati, 2015). This pilot study examined the potential of interior design elements (including artwork) to support the participants’ ability to navigate in one of the reception halls at SUS Malmö hospital. In order to focus on the wordless wayfinding capacity, two subject categories were participating, 1) Arabic speaking visitors; 2) and Swedish speaking visitors. The participants, 4 females and 7 males, responded to a questionnaire in dialogue with the researcher. The data analysis showed that artworks, plants, skylight, furniture, wooden material on walls, and a tilted reception cube were the most eye-catching physical elements associated with wayfinding. Written signs were seen as helpful but sometimes useless due to the fact that they are written only in the Swedish language, whereas artworks was the common language between most of the participants and therefore interesting to further explore. Since the majority of the participants disliked the artworks in the reception hall, the influence of aesthetic preferences on wayfinding could possibly be a fruitful path of further investigation</i><i>. </i></p>},
  author       = {Ibrahim, Muna},
  booktitle    = {ARCH17 3RD INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ARCHITECTURE, RESEARCH, CARE AND HEALTH CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS},
  isbn         = {978-87-93585-00-3},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {04},
  pages        = {91--104},
  publisher    = {Polyteknisk Forlag},
  title        = {Interior design elements influence on users’ wayfinding capacity in a Swedish hospital setting},
  url          = {https://lup.lub.lu.se/search/ws/files/61735405/Muna_Al_Ibrahim_Lund_University_Architecture_and_Built_Environment.pdf},
  year         = {2017},
}