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Simulation of Hcci-Addressing Compression Ratio and Turbocharging

Erlandsson, Olof LU ; Amnéus, Per LU ; Einewall, Patrik LU ; Mauss, Fabian LU and Johansson, Bengt LU (2002) In SAE Technical Papers
Abstract
This paper focuses on the performance and efficiency of an HCCI (Homogenous Charge Compression Ignition) engine system running on natural gas or landfill gas for stationary applications. Zero-dimensional modelling and simulation of the engine, turbo, inlet and exhaust manifolds and inlet air conditioner (intercooler/heater) are used to study the effect of compression ratio and exhaust turbine size on maximum mean effective pressure and efficiency. The extended Zeldovich mechanism is used to estimate NO- formation in order to determine operation limits. Detailed chemical kinetics is used to predict ignition timing.



Simulation of the in-cylinder process gives a minimum gl-value of 2.4 for natural gas, regardless of... (More)
This paper focuses on the performance and efficiency of an HCCI (Homogenous Charge Compression Ignition) engine system running on natural gas or landfill gas for stationary applications. Zero-dimensional modelling and simulation of the engine, turbo, inlet and exhaust manifolds and inlet air conditioner (intercooler/heater) are used to study the effect of compression ratio and exhaust turbine size on maximum mean effective pressure and efficiency. The extended Zeldovich mechanism is used to estimate NO- formation in order to determine operation limits. Detailed chemical kinetics is used to predict ignition timing.



Simulation of the in-cylinder process gives a minimum gl-value of 2.4 for natural gas, regardless of compression ratio. This is restricted by the NO formation for richer mixtures. Lower compression ratios allow higher inlet pressure and hence higher load, but it also reduces indicated efficiency. Given indicated mean effective pressure, IMEP and a fixed friction, FMEP the best brake efficiency was attained at compression ratios of 15:1 to 17:1, according to the simulations.



Full system simulation using three different turbines, showed that the required inlet pressure could not be reached. At these low loads a high compression ratio enables lower inlet temperature. This provides higher mass flow and hence power output. The higher compression ratio also increases the indicated and brake efficiency. Very small turbines or advanced turbocharging technologies seem necessary in order to give acceptable specific power and brake efficiency. (Less)
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author
organization
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
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keywords
Combustion Engines combustion physics laserdiagnostic
in
SAE Technical Papers
publisher
Society of Automotive Engineers
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ade5eb27-088b-409f-83de-e03d4667b085 (old id 707674)
alternative location
http://www.sae.org/technical/papers/2002-01-2862
date added to LUP
2007-12-07 14:05:28
date last changed
2016-11-15 13:22:54
@article{ade5eb27-088b-409f-83de-e03d4667b085,
  abstract     = {This paper focuses on the performance and efficiency of an HCCI (Homogenous Charge Compression Ignition) engine system running on natural gas or landfill gas for stationary applications. Zero-dimensional modelling and simulation of the engine, turbo, inlet and exhaust manifolds and inlet air conditioner (intercooler/heater) are used to study the effect of compression ratio and exhaust turbine size on maximum mean effective pressure and efficiency. The extended Zeldovich mechanism is used to estimate NO- formation in order to determine operation limits. Detailed chemical kinetics is used to predict ignition timing. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
Simulation of the in-cylinder process gives a minimum gl-value of 2.4 for natural gas, regardless of compression ratio. This is restricted by the NO formation for richer mixtures. Lower compression ratios allow higher inlet pressure and hence higher load, but it also reduces indicated efficiency. Given indicated mean effective pressure, IMEP and a fixed friction, FMEP the best brake efficiency was attained at compression ratios of 15:1 to 17:1, according to the simulations. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
Full system simulation using three different turbines, showed that the required inlet pressure could not be reached. At these low loads a high compression ratio enables lower inlet temperature. This provides higher mass flow and hence power output. The higher compression ratio also increases the indicated and brake efficiency. Very small turbines or advanced turbocharging technologies seem necessary in order to give acceptable specific power and brake efficiency.},
  author       = {Erlandsson, Olof and Amnéus, Per and Einewall, Patrik and Mauss, Fabian and Johansson, Bengt},
  keyword      = {Combustion Engines
combustion physics
laserdiagnostic},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {Society of Automotive Engineers},
  series       = {SAE Technical Papers},
  title        = {Simulation of Hcci-Addressing Compression Ratio and Turbocharging},
  year         = {2002},
}