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Development and validation of the predicted heat strain model

Malchaire, J; Piette, A; Kampmann, B; Havenith, G; Mehnert, P; Holmér, Ingvar LU ; Gebhardt, H; Griefahn, B; Alfano, G and Parsons, K (2001) In Annals of Occupational Hygiene 45(2). p.123-135
Abstract
Eight laboratories participated in a concerted research project on the assessment of hot working

conditions. The objectives were, among others, to co-ordinate the work of the main European

research teams in the field of thermal factors and to improve the methods available to

assess the risks of heat disorders at the workplace, and in particular the “Required Sweat

Rate” model as presented in International Standard ISO 7933 Standard (1989). The scientific

bases of this standard were thoroughly reviewed and a revised model, called “Predicted Heat

Strain” (PHS), was developed. This model was then used to predict the minute by minute

sweat rates and rectal temperatures during 909... (More)
Eight laboratories participated in a concerted research project on the assessment of hot working

conditions. The objectives were, among others, to co-ordinate the work of the main European

research teams in the field of thermal factors and to improve the methods available to

assess the risks of heat disorders at the workplace, and in particular the “Required Sweat

Rate” model as presented in International Standard ISO 7933 Standard (1989). The scientific

bases of this standard were thoroughly reviewed and a revised model, called “Predicted Heat

Strain” (PHS), was developed. This model was then used to predict the minute by minute

sweat rates and rectal temperatures during 909 laboratory and field experiments collected

from the partners. The Pearson correlation coefficients between observed and predicted

values were equal to 0.76 and 0.66 for laboratory experiments and 0.74 and 0.59 for field

experiments, respectively, for the sweat rates and the rectal temperatures. The change in

sweat rate with time was predicted more accurately by the PHS model than by the required

sweat rate model. This suggests that the PHS model would provide an improved basis upon

which to determine allowable exposure times from the predicted heat strain in terms of

dehydration and increased core temperature. ã 2001 British Occupational Hygiene Society.

Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
heat stress index, required sweat rate
in
Annals of Occupational Hygiene
volume
45
issue
2
pages
123 - 135
publisher
Oxford University Press
external identifiers
  • scopus:0035147403
ISSN
1475-3162
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
66bbbf47-fe85-49cc-9db7-cc521130eab2 (old id 709446)
alternative location
http://annhyg.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/reprint/45/2/123
http://annhyg.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/45/2/123
date added to LUP
2008-09-26 15:39:04
date last changed
2017-08-13 04:42:20
@article{66bbbf47-fe85-49cc-9db7-cc521130eab2,
  abstract     = {Eight laboratories participated in a concerted research project on the assessment of hot working<br/><br>
conditions. The objectives were, among others, to co-ordinate the work of the main European<br/><br>
research teams in the field of thermal factors and to improve the methods available to<br/><br>
assess the risks of heat disorders at the workplace, and in particular the “Required Sweat<br/><br>
Rate” model as presented in International Standard ISO 7933 Standard (1989). The scientific<br/><br>
bases of this standard were thoroughly reviewed and a revised model, called “Predicted Heat<br/><br>
Strain” (PHS), was developed. This model was then used to predict the minute by minute<br/><br>
sweat rates and rectal temperatures during 909 laboratory and field experiments collected<br/><br>
from the partners. The Pearson correlation coefficients between observed and predicted<br/><br>
values were equal to 0.76 and 0.66 for laboratory experiments and 0.74 and 0.59 for field<br/><br>
experiments, respectively, for the sweat rates and the rectal temperatures. The change in<br/><br>
sweat rate with time was predicted more accurately by the PHS model than by the required<br/><br>
sweat rate model. This suggests that the PHS model would provide an improved basis upon<br/><br>
which to determine allowable exposure times from the predicted heat strain in terms of<br/><br>
dehydration and increased core temperature. ã 2001 British Occupational Hygiene Society.<br/><br>
Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved},
  author       = {Malchaire, J and Piette, A and Kampmann, B and Havenith, G and Mehnert, P and Holmér, Ingvar and Gebhardt, H and Griefahn, B and Alfano, G and Parsons, K},
  issn         = {1475-3162},
  keyword      = {heat stress index,required sweat rate},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {123--135},
  publisher    = {Oxford University Press},
  series       = {Annals of Occupational Hygiene},
  title        = {Development and validation of the predicted heat strain model},
  volume       = {45},
  year         = {2001},
}