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On the internal frost resistance of self-compacting concrete, with and without polypropylene fibres

Persson, Bertil LU (2006) In Materials and Structures vol 39(no 291, August). p.707-716
Abstract
In this article experimental and numerical studies of internal frost resistance of self-compacting and normal concrete, with and without fibres, are outlined. For this purpose self-compacting concrete with low water-cement ratio was studied, with varying amounts of filler, crystalline or sedimentary, different pouring pressures and different mixing procedure with two ages at the start of testing. The concrete was frozen twice a day at ±20°C all around the specimen up to 300 cycles. Measurement of length, weight and internal fundamental frequency were performed at the start of testing, at 100 cycles and at 300 frost cycles. Tests were also carried out on submerged cast self-compacting concrete and on self-compacting concrete with fibres. In... (More)
In this article experimental and numerical studies of internal frost resistance of self-compacting and normal concrete, with and without fibres, are outlined. For this purpose self-compacting concrete with low water-cement ratio was studied, with varying amounts of filler, crystalline or sedimentary, different pouring pressures and different mixing procedure with two ages at the start of testing. The concrete was frozen twice a day at ±20°C all around the specimen up to 300 cycles. Measurement of length, weight and internal fundamental frequency were performed at the start of testing, at 100 cycles and at 300 frost cycles. Tests were also carried out on submerged cast self-compacting concrete and on self-compacting concrete with fibres. In reference tests normal concrete was studied in parallel. In general self-compacting concrete behaved well or better than normal concrete to internal frost except for the submerged cast concrete, where large segregation occurred and low internal frost resistance followed. The main reasons for low internal frost resistance in submerged applications were probably differences in water-cement ratio in the casting due to cement, water or/and aggregate segregation. Polypropylene fibres in concrete seemed to prohibit the movement of water in the air void system so that a sudden internal collapse occurred before 300 frost cycles. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Polypropylenes, Numerical methods, Water, Cements, Filler metals, Segregation (metallography), Crystalline materials, Compaction, Concretes, Frost resistance
in
Materials and Structures
volume
vol 39
issue
no 291, August
pages
707 - 716
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000243151500004
  • scopus:33747115793
ISSN
1359-5997
DOI
10.1617/s11527-006-9116-x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
945525cc-3017-428f-ade8-09c1dda9b92a (old id 715051)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 12:20:02
date last changed
2021-03-24 03:07:46
@article{945525cc-3017-428f-ade8-09c1dda9b92a,
  abstract     = {In this article experimental and numerical studies of internal frost resistance of self-compacting and normal concrete, with and without fibres, are outlined. For this purpose self-compacting concrete with low water-cement ratio was studied, with varying amounts of filler, crystalline or sedimentary, different pouring pressures and different mixing procedure with two ages at the start of testing. The concrete was frozen twice a day at ±20°C all around the specimen up to 300 cycles. Measurement of length, weight and internal fundamental frequency were performed at the start of testing, at 100 cycles and at 300 frost cycles. Tests were also carried out on submerged cast self-compacting concrete and on self-compacting concrete with fibres. In reference tests normal concrete was studied in parallel. In general self-compacting concrete behaved well or better than normal concrete to internal frost except for the submerged cast concrete, where large segregation occurred and low internal frost resistance followed. The main reasons for low internal frost resistance in submerged applications were probably differences in water-cement ratio in the casting due to cement, water or/and aggregate segregation. Polypropylene fibres in concrete seemed to prohibit the movement of water in the air void system so that a sudden internal collapse occurred before 300 frost cycles.},
  author       = {Persson, Bertil},
  issn         = {1359-5997},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {no 291, August},
  pages        = {707--716},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Materials and Structures},
  title        = {On the internal frost resistance of self-compacting concrete, with and without polypropylene fibres},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1617/s11527-006-9116-x},
  doi          = {10.1617/s11527-006-9116-x},
  volume       = {vol 39},
  year         = {2006},
}