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Optimal office lighting use : A Swedish case study

Mattsson, Pimkamol LU and Laike, Thorbjörn LU (2015) In Facilities 33(9/10). p.573-573
Abstract

Purpose
– The purpose of this paper is to determine the optimal office lighting use with different types of lighting controls to achieve energy savings and provide visual comfort for individuals.

Design/methodology/approach
– A case study and field measurements were carried out in 18 single-occupancy offices in Sweden where six different lighting controls were investigated. Occupancy and daylight hours were key issues for determining the lighting use. For each office, occupancy patterns, use of a ceiling luminaire, energy usage and perceptions of office lighting in the spring-summer and autumn-winter were established.

Findings
– The use of luminaires varied among the occupants and could be habitual.... (More)

Purpose
– The purpose of this paper is to determine the optimal office lighting use with different types of lighting controls to achieve energy savings and provide visual comfort for individuals.

Design/methodology/approach
– A case study and field measurements were carried out in 18 single-occupancy offices in Sweden where six different lighting controls were investigated. Occupancy and daylight hours were key issues for determining the lighting use. For each office, occupancy patterns, use of a ceiling luminaire, energy usage and perceptions of office lighting in the spring-summer and autumn-winter were established.

Findings
– The use of luminaires varied among the occupants and could be habitual. Though the study yielded positive results concerning the potential for manual or daylight dimming with occupancy switch-off controls to increase optimal lighting use, combining dimming controls with manual on/off controls is rather effective if occupants generally sit in their offices most of the day.

Research limitations/implications
– Precise comparisons of the performances of the different controls were limited due to the offices’ different window orientations; thus, measurements in identical offices are desirable. The small sample size limited analyses of lighting use and the personal perceptions of lighting quality.

Practical implications
– Apart from the contribution to simulation techniques, the findings imply that office lighting controls should be selected taking individuals’ behavioural patterns and perceived lighting quality into consideration.

Originality/value
– This paper describes an approach to determine the use of lighting controls and provides a basis for establishing optimal lighting use for individuals with regard to occupancy and daylight availability.
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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
energy savings, lightning, lightning control, individual, occupancy
in
Facilities
volume
33
issue
9/10
pages
587 pages
publisher
Emerald Group Publishing Limited
external identifiers
  • scopus:84930986459
ISSN
0263-2772
DOI
10.1108/F-01-2014-0004
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
729fc1e4-63f7-4d15-ba81-acf67d73320b
date added to LUP
2016-11-16 15:43:30
date last changed
2017-04-30 17:43:09
@article{729fc1e4-63f7-4d15-ba81-acf67d73320b,
  abstract     = {<br/>Purpose<br/>– The purpose of this paper is to determine the optimal office lighting use with different types of lighting controls to achieve energy savings and provide visual comfort for individuals.<br/><br/>Design/methodology/approach<br/>– A case study and field measurements were carried out in 18 single-occupancy offices in Sweden where six different lighting controls were investigated. Occupancy and daylight hours were key issues for determining the lighting use. For each office, occupancy patterns, use of a ceiling luminaire, energy usage and perceptions of office lighting in the spring-summer and autumn-winter were established.<br/><br/>Findings<br/>– The use of luminaires varied among the occupants and could be habitual. Though the study yielded positive results concerning the potential for manual or daylight dimming with occupancy switch-off controls to increase optimal lighting use, combining dimming controls with manual on/off controls is rather effective if occupants generally sit in their offices most of the day.<br/><br/>Research limitations/implications<br/>– Precise comparisons of the performances of the different controls were limited due to the offices’ different window orientations; thus, measurements in identical offices are desirable. The small sample size limited analyses of lighting use and the personal perceptions of lighting quality.<br/><br/>Practical implications<br/>– Apart from the contribution to simulation techniques, the findings imply that office lighting controls should be selected taking individuals’ behavioural patterns and perceived lighting quality into consideration.<br/><br/>Originality/value<br/>– This paper describes an approach to determine the use of lighting controls and provides a basis for establishing optimal lighting use for individuals with regard to occupancy and daylight availability.<br/>},
  author       = {Mattsson, Pimkamol and Laike, Thorbjörn},
  issn         = {0263-2772},
  keyword      = {energy savings,lightning,lightning control,individual,occupancy},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9/10},
  pages        = {573--573},
  publisher    = {Emerald Group Publishing Limited},
  series       = {Facilities},
  title        = {Optimal office lighting use : A Swedish case study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/F-01-2014-0004},
  volume       = {33},
  year         = {2015},
}