Advanced

On the biologically effective dose (BED)-using convolution for calculating the effects of repair: II. Numerical considerations.

Gustafsson, Johan Ruben LU ; Nilsson, Per LU and Sjögreen Gleisner, Katarina LU (2013) In Physics in Medicine and Biology 58(5). p.1529-1548
Abstract
We have previously shown analytically that the biologically effective dose (BED), including effects of repair during irradiation and of incomplete repair between fractions, can be formulated using a convolution between the absorbed dose rate function and the function describing repair. In this work, a discrete formalism is derived along with its implementation via the fast Fourier transform. The implementation takes the intrinsic periodicity of the discrete Fourier transform into consideration, as well as possible inconsistencies that may arise due to discretization and truncation of the functions describing the absorbed dose rate and repair. Numerically and analytically calculated BED values are compared for various situations in external... (More)
We have previously shown analytically that the biologically effective dose (BED), including effects of repair during irradiation and of incomplete repair between fractions, can be formulated using a convolution between the absorbed dose rate function and the function describing repair. In this work, a discrete formalism is derived along with its implementation via the fast Fourier transform. The implementation takes the intrinsic periodicity of the discrete Fourier transform into consideration, as well as possible inconsistencies that may arise due to discretization and truncation of the functions describing the absorbed dose rate and repair. Numerically and analytically calculated BED values are compared for various situations in external beam radiotherapy, brachytherapy and radionuclide therapy, including the use of different repair models. The numerical method is shown to be accurate and versatile since it can be applied to any kind of absorbed dose rate function and allows for the incorporation of different repair models. Typical accuracies for clinically realistic examples are in the order of 10(-3)% to 10(-5)%. The method has thus the potential of being a useful tool for the calculation of BED, also in situations with complicated irradiation patterns or repair functions. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Physics in Medicine and Biology
volume
58
issue
5
pages
1529 - 1548
publisher
IOP Publishing
external identifiers
  • wos:000315191400023
  • pmid:23406832
  • scopus:84880948891
  • pmid:23406832
ISSN
1361-6560
DOI
10.1088/0031-9155/58/5/1529
language
English
LU publication?
yes
additional info
The information about affiliations in this record was updated in December 2015. The record was previously connected to the following departments: Radiation Physics, Lund (013034000), Reconstructive Surgery (013240300)
id
7333d106-f769-4071-a8bc-5506cf70b534 (old id 3559831)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23406832?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 09:47:29
date last changed
2020-01-05 03:00:39
@article{7333d106-f769-4071-a8bc-5506cf70b534,
  abstract     = {We have previously shown analytically that the biologically effective dose (BED), including effects of repair during irradiation and of incomplete repair between fractions, can be formulated using a convolution between the absorbed dose rate function and the function describing repair. In this work, a discrete formalism is derived along with its implementation via the fast Fourier transform. The implementation takes the intrinsic periodicity of the discrete Fourier transform into consideration, as well as possible inconsistencies that may arise due to discretization and truncation of the functions describing the absorbed dose rate and repair. Numerically and analytically calculated BED values are compared for various situations in external beam radiotherapy, brachytherapy and radionuclide therapy, including the use of different repair models. The numerical method is shown to be accurate and versatile since it can be applied to any kind of absorbed dose rate function and allows for the incorporation of different repair models. Typical accuracies for clinically realistic examples are in the order of 10(-3)% to 10(-5)%. The method has thus the potential of being a useful tool for the calculation of BED, also in situations with complicated irradiation patterns or repair functions.},
  author       = {Gustafsson, Johan Ruben and Nilsson, Per and Sjögreen Gleisner, Katarina},
  issn         = {1361-6560},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {1529--1548},
  publisher    = {IOP Publishing},
  series       = {Physics in Medicine and Biology},
  title        = {On the biologically effective dose (BED)-using convolution for calculating the effects of repair: II. Numerical considerations.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/0031-9155/58/5/1529},
  doi          = {10.1088/0031-9155/58/5/1529},
  volume       = {58},
  year         = {2013},
}