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Motor properties from persistence: a linear molecular walker lacking spatial and temporal asymmetry

Zuckermann, Martin J.; Angstmann, Christopher N.; Schmitt, Regina LU ; Blab, Gerhard A.; Bromley, Elizabeth H. C.; Forde, Nancy R.; Linke, Heiner LU and Curmi, Paul M. G. (2015) In New Journal of Physics 17.
Abstract
The stepping direction of linear molecular motors is usually defined by a spatial asymmetry of the motor, its track, or both. Here we present a model for a molecular walker that undergoes biased directional motion along a symmetric track in the presence of a temporally symmetric chemical cycle. Instead of using asymmetry, directionality is achieved by persistence. At small load force the walker can take on average thousands of steps in a given direction until it stochastically reverses direction. We discuss a specific experimental implementation of a synthetic motor based on this design and find, using Langevin and Monte Carlo simulations, that a realistic walker can work against load forces on the order of picoNewtons with an efficiency... (More)
The stepping direction of linear molecular motors is usually defined by a spatial asymmetry of the motor, its track, or both. Here we present a model for a molecular walker that undergoes biased directional motion along a symmetric track in the presence of a temporally symmetric chemical cycle. Instead of using asymmetry, directionality is achieved by persistence. At small load force the walker can take on average thousands of steps in a given direction until it stochastically reverses direction. We discuss a specific experimental implementation of a synthetic motor based on this design and find, using Langevin and Monte Carlo simulations, that a realistic walker can work against load forces on the order of picoNewtons with an efficiency of similar to 18%, comparable to that of kinesin. In principle, the walker can be turned into a permanent motor by externally monitoring the walker's momentary direction of motion, and using feedback to adjust the direction of a load force. We calculate the thermodynamic cost of using feedback to enhance motor performance in terms of the Shannon entropy, and find that it reduces the efficiency of a realistic motor only marginally. We discuss the implications for natural protein motor performance in the context of the strong performance of this design based only on a thermal ratchet. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
feedback control, artificial protein motor, Langevin dynamics, kinesin, Brownian ratchet, molecular motor
in
New Journal of Physics
volume
17
publisher
IOP Publishing Ltd.
external identifiers
  • wos:000355280000001
  • scopus:84930010334
ISSN
1367-2630
DOI
10.1088/1367-2630/17/5/055017
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
5c19eec4-19fa-46f3-96b4-fe4a9ed68ede (old id 7410694)
date added to LUP
2015-06-29 11:19:19
date last changed
2017-07-02 03:59:39
@article{5c19eec4-19fa-46f3-96b4-fe4a9ed68ede,
  abstract     = {The stepping direction of linear molecular motors is usually defined by a spatial asymmetry of the motor, its track, or both. Here we present a model for a molecular walker that undergoes biased directional motion along a symmetric track in the presence of a temporally symmetric chemical cycle. Instead of using asymmetry, directionality is achieved by persistence. At small load force the walker can take on average thousands of steps in a given direction until it stochastically reverses direction. We discuss a specific experimental implementation of a synthetic motor based on this design and find, using Langevin and Monte Carlo simulations, that a realistic walker can work against load forces on the order of picoNewtons with an efficiency of similar to 18%, comparable to that of kinesin. In principle, the walker can be turned into a permanent motor by externally monitoring the walker's momentary direction of motion, and using feedback to adjust the direction of a load force. We calculate the thermodynamic cost of using feedback to enhance motor performance in terms of the Shannon entropy, and find that it reduces the efficiency of a realistic motor only marginally. We discuss the implications for natural protein motor performance in the context of the strong performance of this design based only on a thermal ratchet.},
  articleno    = {055017},
  author       = {Zuckermann, Martin J. and Angstmann, Christopher N. and Schmitt, Regina and Blab, Gerhard A. and Bromley, Elizabeth H. C. and Forde, Nancy R. and Linke, Heiner and Curmi, Paul M. G.},
  issn         = {1367-2630},
  keyword      = {feedback control,artificial protein motor,Langevin dynamics,kinesin,Brownian ratchet,molecular motor},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {IOP Publishing Ltd.},
  series       = {New Journal of Physics},
  title        = {Motor properties from persistence: a linear molecular walker lacking spatial and temporal asymmetry},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1367-2630/17/5/055017},
  volume       = {17},
  year         = {2015},
}