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Calidad de los datos del Instituto Nacional de Estadística para la elaboración de los indicadores de salud perinatal: pequeño y grande para su edad gestacional

Juarez, Sol Pia LU (2015) In Revista Española de Salud Pública 89(1). p.85-91
Abstract
Background: Relative measures of birthweight (small and large-for-gestational age, SGA-LGA) are increasingly preferred to absolute measures (low birthweight, macrosomia). In this study we assess whether the national vital statistics provided by the Spanish National Statistical Institute (INE) reliably estimate SGA and LGA. Also, we will assess whether missing data (selection) and misreported information (bias) are systematically associated with parental socioeconomic information. Methods: We linked the information on 6,339 births at the Hospital Clinico San Carlos of Madrid (2005-06) with the vital statistics records (successful for the 95% of the observation). Validity measures and concordance were estimated for low birthweight (LBW,... (More)
Background: Relative measures of birthweight (small and large-for-gestational age, SGA-LGA) are increasingly preferred to absolute measures (low birthweight, macrosomia). In this study we assess whether the national vital statistics provided by the Spanish National Statistical Institute (INE) reliably estimate SGA and LGA. Also, we will assess whether missing data (selection) and misreported information (bias) are systematically associated with parental socioeconomic information. Methods: We linked the information on 6,339 births at the Hospital Clinico San Carlos of Madrid (2005-06) with the vital statistics records (successful for the 95% of the observation). Validity measures and concordance were estimated for low birthweight (LBW, <2500 gr), macrosomia (>4500 gr), SGA (<10th percentile) and LGA (>90 percentile). Logistic regressions were fitted. Results: The prevalence estimated with the hospital data were: LBW (6%), macrosomia (0.5%) SGA (1%) and LGA (15%) and, with the data from INE: 5% 0.5% 2% 12% respectively. Kappa statistics: LBW (83%), macrosomia (79%), PEG (24%) and LGA (82%). Missing and misreported data vary with parental nationality and their situation in the labor market (OR between 1.5 y 2.2). Conclusions: Vital statistics overestimate the prevalence of SGA and underestimate the prevalence of LGA. The concordance between the sources is very good for low birthweight, macrosomia and LGA, and moderately good for SGA. Both missing and misreported birthweight and gestational age are associated with parental socioeconomic characteristics. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
alternative title
Quality of the Spanish Vital Statistics to Estimate Perinatal Health Outcomes: Small and Large for Gestational Age
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Small-for-gestational age, Large-for-gestational age, Macrosomia, Low-birthweight, Birthweight, Gestational age, Validation
in
Revista Española de Salud Pública
volume
89
issue
1
pages
85 - 91
publisher
Ministerio de Sanidad, Servicios Sociales e Igualdad
external identifiers
  • wos:000355322700009
  • scopus:84928173347
ISSN
1135-5727
language
Spanish
LU publication?
yes
id
fc555971-3779-4496-a58a-0970f465320f (old id 7411041)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=25946588
date added to LUP
2015-07-03 07:02:41
date last changed
2017-10-22 04:20:46
@article{fc555971-3779-4496-a58a-0970f465320f,
  abstract     = {Background: Relative measures of birthweight (small and large-for-gestational age, SGA-LGA) are increasingly preferred to absolute measures (low birthweight, macrosomia). In this study we assess whether the national vital statistics provided by the Spanish National Statistical Institute (INE) reliably estimate SGA and LGA. Also, we will assess whether missing data (selection) and misreported information (bias) are systematically associated with parental socioeconomic information. Methods: We linked the information on 6,339 births at the Hospital Clinico San Carlos of Madrid (2005-06) with the vital statistics records (successful for the 95% of the observation). Validity measures and concordance were estimated for low birthweight (LBW, &lt;2500 gr), macrosomia (&gt;4500 gr), SGA (&lt;10th percentile) and LGA (&gt;90 percentile). Logistic regressions were fitted. Results: The prevalence estimated with the hospital data were: LBW (6%), macrosomia (0.5%) SGA (1%) and LGA (15%) and, with the data from INE: 5% 0.5% 2% 12% respectively. Kappa statistics: LBW (83%), macrosomia (79%), PEG (24%) and LGA (82%). Missing and misreported data vary with parental nationality and their situation in the labor market (OR between 1.5 y 2.2). Conclusions: Vital statistics overestimate the prevalence of SGA and underestimate the prevalence of LGA. The concordance between the sources is very good for low birthweight, macrosomia and LGA, and moderately good for SGA. Both missing and misreported birthweight and gestational age are associated with parental socioeconomic characteristics.},
  author       = {Juarez, Sol Pia},
  issn         = {1135-5727},
  keyword      = {Small-for-gestational age,Large-for-gestational age,Macrosomia,Low-birthweight,Birthweight,Gestational age,Validation},
  language     = {spa},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {85--91},
  publisher    = {Ministerio de Sanidad, Servicios Sociales e Igualdad},
  series       = {Revista Española de Salud Pública},
  title        = {Calidad de los datos del Instituto Nacional de Estadística para la elaboración de los indicadores de salud perinatal: pequeño y grande para su edad gestacional},
  volume       = {89},
  year         = {2015},
}