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Inter-country exploration of factors associated with admission to long-term institutional dementia care: evidence from the RightTimePlaceCare study

Verbeek, Hilde; Meyer, Gabriele; Challis, David; Zabalegui, Adelaida; Soto, Maria E.; Saks, Kai; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Karlsson, Staffan LU and Hamers, Jan P. H. (2015) In Journal of Advanced Nursing 71(6). p.1338-1350
Abstract
AimTo explore inter-country variation of factors associated with institutionalization of people with dementia. BackgroundThere is an urgent need for evidence on whether factors associated with admission to institutional dementia care are applicable across healthcare systems, as increasing evidence suggests that these factors could be country-specific. DesignA prospective cohort study. MethodPrimary data were collected in eight European countries, at baseline and after 3months follow-up (November 2010-April 2012). The sample included 2014 dyads of people with dementia and their informal caregivers; 791 patients were recently institutionalized, 1223 patients lived at home and were at risk of institutionalization. Associations between care... (More)
AimTo explore inter-country variation of factors associated with institutionalization of people with dementia. BackgroundThere is an urgent need for evidence on whether factors associated with admission to institutional dementia care are applicable across healthcare systems, as increasing evidence suggests that these factors could be country-specific. DesignA prospective cohort study. MethodPrimary data were collected in eight European countries, at baseline and after 3months follow-up (November 2010-April 2012). The sample included 2014 dyads of people with dementia and their informal caregivers; 791 patients were recently institutionalized, 1223 patients lived at home and were at risk of institutionalization. Associations between care setting (institution vs. home) and factors shown to influence institutionalization (e.g. cognition, independence in activities of daily life, behaviour) were studied. ResultsConsiderable differences were found between the eight countries in characteristics of people with dementia who had been recently admitted to ILTC. However, caregiver burden appeared the most consistent factor associated with institutionalization in all analyses. Indications for the importance of independence in activities of daily life were found as well, although country differences may be more prominent for this factor. ConclusionEvidence was found for two common factors, crucial in the process of institutionalization across countries: caregiver burden and independency in activities of daily life. However, this study also suggests that admission to institutional dementia care is context-specific, as wide variation exists in factors associated with institutionalization across countries. Tailored best-practice strategies are needed to reflect variations in response to these needs. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
dementia, long-term care, nursing, nursing homes
in
Journal of Advanced Nursing
volume
71
issue
6
pages
1338 - 1350
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000354394800014
  • scopus:84929508372
ISSN
0309-2402
DOI
10.1111/jan.12663
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
7db9d8f3-db13-4817-a9f2-a7c911ce2cb2 (old id 7425238)
date added to LUP
2015-07-03 07:06:32
date last changed
2017-07-23 03:24:24
@article{7db9d8f3-db13-4817-a9f2-a7c911ce2cb2,
  abstract     = {AimTo explore inter-country variation of factors associated with institutionalization of people with dementia. BackgroundThere is an urgent need for evidence on whether factors associated with admission to institutional dementia care are applicable across healthcare systems, as increasing evidence suggests that these factors could be country-specific. DesignA prospective cohort study. MethodPrimary data were collected in eight European countries, at baseline and after 3months follow-up (November 2010-April 2012). The sample included 2014 dyads of people with dementia and their informal caregivers; 791 patients were recently institutionalized, 1223 patients lived at home and were at risk of institutionalization. Associations between care setting (institution vs. home) and factors shown to influence institutionalization (e.g. cognition, independence in activities of daily life, behaviour) were studied. ResultsConsiderable differences were found between the eight countries in characteristics of people with dementia who had been recently admitted to ILTC. However, caregiver burden appeared the most consistent factor associated with institutionalization in all analyses. Indications for the importance of independence in activities of daily life were found as well, although country differences may be more prominent for this factor. ConclusionEvidence was found for two common factors, crucial in the process of institutionalization across countries: caregiver burden and independency in activities of daily life. However, this study also suggests that admission to institutional dementia care is context-specific, as wide variation exists in factors associated with institutionalization across countries. Tailored best-practice strategies are needed to reflect variations in response to these needs.},
  author       = {Verbeek, Hilde and Meyer, Gabriele and Challis, David and Zabalegui, Adelaida and Soto, Maria E. and Saks, Kai and Leino-Kilpi, Helena and Karlsson, Staffan and Hamers, Jan P. H.},
  issn         = {0309-2402},
  keyword      = {dementia,long-term care,nursing,nursing homes},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {1338--1350},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Journal of Advanced Nursing},
  title        = {Inter-country exploration of factors associated with admission to long-term institutional dementia care: evidence from the RightTimePlaceCare study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jan.12663},
  volume       = {71},
  year         = {2015},
}