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Epigenetic determinism in science and society

Waggoner, Miranda R. and Uller, Tobias LU (2015) In New Genetics and Society 34(2). p.177-195
Abstract
The epigenetic "revolution" in science cuts across many disciplines, and it is now one of the fastest-growing research areas in biology. Increasingly, claims are made that epigenetics research represents a move away from the genetic determinism that has been prominent both in biological research and in understandings of the impact of biology on society. We discuss to what extent an epigenetic framework actually supports these claims. We show that, in contrast to the received view, epigenetics research is often couched in language as deterministic as genetics research in both science and the popular press. We engage the rapidly emerging conversation about the impact of epigenetics on public discourse and scientific practice, and we contend... (More)
The epigenetic "revolution" in science cuts across many disciplines, and it is now one of the fastest-growing research areas in biology. Increasingly, claims are made that epigenetics research represents a move away from the genetic determinism that has been prominent both in biological research and in understandings of the impact of biology on society. We discuss to what extent an epigenetic framework actually supports these claims. We show that, in contrast to the received view, epigenetics research is often couched in language as deterministic as genetics research in both science and the popular press. We engage the rapidly emerging conversation about the impact of epigenetics on public discourse and scientific practice, and we contend that the notion of epigenetic determinism - or the belief that epigenetic mechanisms determine the expression of human traits and behaviors - matters for understandings of the influence of biology and society on population health. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
epigenetics revolution, epigenetic determinism, genetic determinism, epigenetics
in
New Genetics and Society
volume
34
issue
2
pages
177 - 195
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000354371300004
  • scopus:84929253804
ISSN
1463-6778
DOI
10.1080/14636778.2015.1033052
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
9b2c4f08-e47e-445a-a9e0-7acb769a94b6 (old id 7432687)
date added to LUP
2015-06-25 09:53:18
date last changed
2017-10-22 03:27:09
@article{9b2c4f08-e47e-445a-a9e0-7acb769a94b6,
  abstract     = {The epigenetic "revolution" in science cuts across many disciplines, and it is now one of the fastest-growing research areas in biology. Increasingly, claims are made that epigenetics research represents a move away from the genetic determinism that has been prominent both in biological research and in understandings of the impact of biology on society. We discuss to what extent an epigenetic framework actually supports these claims. We show that, in contrast to the received view, epigenetics research is often couched in language as deterministic as genetics research in both science and the popular press. We engage the rapidly emerging conversation about the impact of epigenetics on public discourse and scientific practice, and we contend that the notion of epigenetic determinism - or the belief that epigenetic mechanisms determine the expression of human traits and behaviors - matters for understandings of the influence of biology and society on population health.},
  author       = {Waggoner, Miranda R. and Uller, Tobias},
  issn         = {1463-6778},
  keyword      = {epigenetics revolution,epigenetic determinism,genetic determinism,epigenetics},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {177--195},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {New Genetics and Society},
  title        = {Epigenetic determinism in science and society},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14636778.2015.1033052},
  volume       = {34},
  year         = {2015},
}